K. V. Turley

About K. V. Turley

K.V. Turley writes from London.

“Triumph of the Will”: The Culture of Death on Screen

By |2020-09-03T00:11:08-05:00September 3rd, 2020|Categories: Culture, Death, Europe, Film, History, War, World War II|

Commissioned by Adolf Hitler, “Triumph of the Will” is a terrifying film. It is as if, for a moment, something infernal took control of the camera and caused the audience to be entranced, as it projected a lie into Germany’s consciousness, and then beyond to an unwilling world. As a consequence, 85 million people [...]

“The Act of Killing”: Unquiet Graves and Troubled Consciences

By |2020-01-24T15:16:28-06:00January 30th, 2020|Categories: Communism, Culture, Fascism, Film, History, Politics, StAR|

A few years back, a film, The Act of Killing (2012), ran at a London cinema for 52 weeks. Such a run is unusual for any film: even more so for a documentary feature about Indonesia. The film’s subject matter revolves around one man, Anwar Congo, who is convivial, charming even, and with real [...]

Curses and Magic in the “Night of the Demon”

By |2019-10-30T17:32:43-05:00October 30th, 2019|Categories: C.S. Lewis, Christian Humanism, Culture, Fiction, Film, Literature|

Like the best horror tales, the “Night of the Demon” came back from the “dead.” This was as a result of a late-night slot for cult movies on British television in the late 1980s. Continuing to this day, the film has attracted ever-increasing praise from critics and found an ever-more appreciative audience. It seems [...]

“Stalker”: The Search for Faith Amidst Desolation

By |2019-09-28T09:49:41-05:00February 28th, 2019|Categories: Christianity, Culture, Film, Russia, St. John Paul II, StAR|

Andrei Tarkovsky’s film Stalker is about a man who leads others, however obliquely, and despite obstacles, both external and internal, to faith. Faith is faith. Without it, man is deprived of any spiritual roots. He is like a blind man. Just more than thirty years ago, on 26 April 1986, a nuclear disaster occurred at the Chernobyl Nuclear [...]

Did John Paul II Change the Course of Irish History?

By |2020-03-16T11:41:29-05:00January 26th, 2019|Categories: Catholicism, Film, Government, Ireland, Politics, St. John Paul II, StAR, War|

Did the speech made by Pope John Paul II at Drogheda during his visit to Ireland in 1979 change the course of Irish history? This is the contention of a new documentary John Paul II in Ireland: A Plea for Peace, written and directed by David Naglieri. The originality of the film’s premise lies [...]

The Long Shadows Cast by “Nightmare Alley”

By |2018-11-30T18:08:22-06:00November 23rd, 2018|Categories: Books, Culture, Film, Tragedy, World War II|

Just as the Second World War ended, the 1946 novel Nightmare Alley by William Lindsay Gresham became a bestseller. Perhaps more than any other, the noir genre fitted the mood of Post–war America. It was a nation that had not yet emerged blinking into the Technicolor 1950s of Eisenhower and later prosperity. It was [...]

Alfred Hitchcock’s “The 39 Steps”: A Coded Message?

By |2019-09-28T09:49:59-05:00October 4th, 2018|Categories: Film, History, Mystery, StAR, World War II|

The 39 Steps is one of five films that Alfred Hitchcock made in England about espionage in the mid-to-late 1930s. These films capture the growing threat felt in Britain from foreign powers. In their scenarios the nation's security was nowhere more threatened than by spies hiding in plain sight... The Thirty-Nine Steps. A novel. Then a film: The 39 Steps. In the end, that [...]

Mel Gibson, “Hacksaw Ridge,” & the Real Hollywood Counter-Culture

By |2019-09-28T09:50:01-05:00August 30th, 2018|Categories: Catholicism, Christianity, Culture, Film, StAR|

In Hacksaw Ridge, Mel Gibson continues to present an alternative world-view to filmgoers. It is one at odds with almost all that emanates from Hollywood, but, nevertheless, is one that finds a welcome reception in the real world, where family and marriage, patriotism and courage, faith and self-sacrifice still form part of the daily lives [...]

The Wages of Sin: Jean-Pierre Melville’s Doomed Universe

By |2019-09-28T09:50:03-05:00July 25th, 2018|Categories: Death, Film, StAR|

In Jean-Pierre Melville’s Le Doulos, it is as if there is an existential darkness present throughout. In this world, no matter how cunning the schemes or how fail-safe the get-away plans are, for all concerned there is a retribution coming. In Melville’s cinematic universe the wages of sin are always death… Recently, at London’s British Film [...]

Ireland’s Brave New World

By |2018-06-04T00:03:34-05:00June 4th, 2018|Categories: Abortion, Catholicism, Christianity, Culture, Ireland, Politics|

Ireland has chosen between life and death. Death it shall have. The fallacy that a liberal abortion regime solves anything will soon become apparent to Irish citizens… Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold; Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world, The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere The ceremony of innocence is drowned… [...]

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