Matthew Pheneger

About Matthew Pheneger

Matthew Pheneger studies international and comparative law at Case Western Reserve University. He attended Ohio Wesleyan University and Anglo-American University in Prague, where he studied Classics, Philosophy, and International Relations.

Cancelling the Classics? The Woke Crowd Comes for Homer’s “Odyssey”

By |2021-01-16T16:44:18-06:00January 16th, 2021|Categories: Education, Great Books, Homer, Literature, Odyssey, Western Civilization|

The “woke” crowd is now intent on tossing out Homer’s “Odyssey” and challenging classical literary tradition. They want to inculcate a Jacobin uniformity of belief in the minds of future generations. How much easier will it be to recast history in the rigid terms of oppressor and oppressed, of exploiter and exploited, when no one [...]

Zombie Legends in the Age of Mass Man

By |2020-10-30T15:23:04-05:00October 30th, 2020|Categories: Culture, Death, Halloween, Imagination, Literature, Modernity, Myth|

Zombie legends remain a relevant medium that continues to capture the imaginations of modern people. As with any myth or legend, we gain wisdom about ourselves when we endeavor to unearth the symbolic meanings that lie buried beneath the surface. At times, what we find is as frightening as it is illuminating. With the Halloween [...]

Craft, Vocation, and the Decline of the West

By |2020-09-02T14:07:56-05:00September 6th, 2020|Categories: Civilization, Conservatism, Culture, Modernity, Western Civilization|

To counteract the disorder of a city engulfed by internal strife and upheaval, we in the West would do well to rediscover the true meaning of vocation. We may cultivate an abundant yield simply by applying the virtues we associate with the master craftsman—diligence, recognition of quality, and striving for mastery—to whatever we do, whether [...]

Ernst Jünger’s “The Forest Passage” and the Conservative Mind

By |2020-07-20T13:42:50-05:00July 21st, 2020|Categories: Books, Conservatism, Freedom, Imagination, Literature, Myth, Nature|

Written in the shadow of the Second World War, Ernst Jünger’s “The Forest Passage” reimagines the forest as a symbol of freedom in an age where the “Leviathan,” or all-encompassing totalitarian state, threatens to encroach on liberty and free space. Yet as long as the “forest rebel” has access to the domains of art, philosophy, [...]

The Intrepid Soul: Why We Need the Classics and Humanities

By |2020-06-09T16:33:36-05:00June 9th, 2020|Categories: Classics, Coronavirus, Culture, Education, Humanities, Modernity|

To justify the Classics and Humanities, some have tried to argue that they remain a practical option for students, couching their praise in terms readily amenable to the outcome-focused mentalities of today’s high-achieving students. But does reducing the Classics and Humanities to a series of “practical” stepping-stones do the subjects any justice? Colleges and universities [...]

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