“The Language of God”: The Man Who Saw God Through a Microscope

By |2020-07-07T10:41:40-05:00July 7th, 2020|Categories: Books, Christianity, Darwin, Existence of God, Faith, Nature, Reason, Science, St. Augustine|

In “The Language of God,” Francis Collins breaks into the debate between faith and reason with intelligible writing and with the strength of his experience as a scientist and the nine-years director of the Human Genome Project. He is a man who found God while deciphering the hidden codes of life. The Language of [...]

Ledwidge, Spenser, and Pastoral Poetry

By |2020-06-23T18:05:22-05:00June 23rd, 2020|Categories: Literature, Nature, Poetry|

The arrival of the summer months signals joy for many, and their departure is a reminder of another year gone by. Pastoral poetry, however, is special because it allows us to contemplate our “ripening of age” and to view it along the course of nature as a process filled with beauty—both in its blossoming [...]

Geography’s Revenge: Space & Human Action in German History

By |2020-05-27T18:54:05-05:00May 27th, 2020|Categories: Civilization, Europe, History, Nature|

We cannot interpret our past or approach the future based upon the assumption that individuals and groups are mere passive chess pieces. We must more appreciate the constraints of the earth, without capitulating to them with aggression or inertia. In 1440, at the heart of the Rhine Valley, Johannes Gutenberg perfected the first European [...]

Forces of Nature: Reflections on COVID-19, My Mother, and Life

By |2020-03-23T14:42:19-05:00March 23rd, 2020|Categories: Community, Coronavirus, Culture, Nature, Wisdom|

If you’re feeling threatened by disease, I want you to know that many people the world over have felt that way for many centuries and they nonetheless held fast, carried on as best they were able, and rejoiced whenever they could. So, here’s what I think of the current COVID-19 situation: Be mentally, emotionally, [...]

The Deep Power of Joy

By |2020-05-12T00:08:04-05:00March 7th, 2020|Categories: Culture, Education, Glenn Arbery, Nature, Poetry, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

Wordsworth’s introspection in “Tintern Abbey” leads him to attempt to answer the question we ask with our curriculum at our college: How does the experience of unforgettable natural beauty in the full vitality of youth affect the moral and spiritual life that follows? As all the world should know, the curriculum at Wyoming Catholic [...]

Understanding Hegel’s Theory on Time

By |2019-11-05T00:36:59-06:00November 4th, 2019|Categories: E.B., Eva Brann, In Honor of Eva Brann at 90 Series, Liberal Learning, Nature, Order, Philosophy, St. John's College, Time|

Time, it will turn out, is a kind of intuiting, indeed the matrix of all intuiting, but it is not therefore to be intuited, that is, looked at, rather than thought out. The moving pictures that Hegel himself suggests to illustrate the emerging determinations of thought are only concessions to our ordinarily representational minds. This [...]

Emily Dickinson and Drinking All Summer Long

By |2019-08-14T21:49:54-05:00August 14th, 2019|Categories: Christine Norvell, Imagination, Literature, Nature, Poetry, Senior Contributors|

Emily Dickinson creates a simple buffet for our imagination in her nature and summer poems, but most especially in "I taste a liquor never brewed." And rather than being accosted by her “drunkenness,” I embrace her abandoned delight in the essence of summer. I taste a liquor never brewed – From Tankards scooped in Pearl [...]

Charles Darwin’s Two Faulty Metaphors

By |2019-08-04T21:59:11-05:00August 4th, 2019|Categories: Culture, Darwin, George Stanciu, Nature, Science, Senior Contributors|

Charles Darwin’s notion of the survival of the fittest remains a sacred idea in science—no indeed, in modern Western culture. The imagined war of every organism against every other represents a profound enculturation of science, prejudicing theories and obscuring the facts. The evidence, however, clearly shows that nature is not competitive but cooperative. “Charles [...]

Land as Literary Character

By |2019-07-24T22:30:22-05:00July 24th, 2019|Categories: Character, Christine Norvell, Fiction, Literature, Nature, Senior Contributors|

Relationship is integral to any story, and more so as the environment itself interacts with a clearly human personality. Willa Cather’s land can reflect the many paradoxes within us to show us more of ourselves, all the greater reason to see her settings as characters of value, power, and influence. In the world of [...]

“Dandelion Wine”: Awakening to the World

By |2019-12-26T12:09:23-06:00July 15th, 2019|Categories: Beauty, Books, Christine Norvell, Fiction, Literature, Nature, Ray Bradbury, Senior Contributors|

Dandelion Wine is a summer read if ever there was one. I know quite a few Ray Bradbury lovers who read it as a summer ritual, and for good reason. From the first moments when we meet Douglas Spaulding, we know his life is one of imagination and adventure. In Dandelion Wine, Doug is [...]

Are We Apart From or A Part of Nature?

By |2020-04-02T23:58:47-05:00July 1st, 2019|Categories: George Stanciu, Intelligence, Language, Nature, Science, Senior Contributors|

Our capacity to grasp universals and natural laws sets us apart from the other animals, and, in that sense, we are apart from nature. Human beings in some mysterious way transcend space and time; through science, philosophy, and art, we rise above nature. We live in time, yet touch the timeless. Several years ago, [...]

Beauty and the Imagination

By |2019-02-01T10:10:26-06:00January 27th, 2019|Categories: Beauty, Christian Humanism, Culture, G.K. Chesterton, Imagination, Nature, Order, Timeless Essays|

The imagination is a gift from God, given in His own image, to conceive of a Glorious Reality that does exist, that we cannot yet fully see... Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join Aaron Ames, as he considers the Divine source of beauty and imagination.—W. Winston Elliott [...]