Siobhan Nash-Marshall

About Siobhan Nash-Marshall

Siobhan Nash-Marshall holds the Mary T. Clark Chair of Christian Philosophy at Manhattanville College. Author of many academic books and articles on metaphysics and the problem of evil, she has also written books and articles for a general readership. In recent years, she has devoted her attention to genocide and genocide negationism. Her most recent book, The Sins of the Fathers: Turkish Denialism and the Armenian Genocide (New York: Herder&Herder, 2018) is her first book-length treatment of the topic. After the breakout of the war in Syria, she and some friends founded CINF USA, through which they attempt to help the ancient Christian cultures of the world which are presently in peril.

Armenian Genocide and Bernard Lewis

By |2020-10-13T12:57:59-05:00October 14th, 2020|Categories: Death, Europe, Middle East, Truth|

The present bombing of Armenia and Artsakh is meant to fulfill the Young Turk dream of building an Empire. That dream is alive and well in Turkey’s government today. By honoring and listening to historian Bernard Lewis, we have become accomplices of that dream, that nightmare. It is time to wake up and hold [...]

On Nightmares, Crowds, and Getting It Wrong

By |2020-10-06T16:49:03-05:00October 6th, 2020|Categories: Culture, Music, Nature, Philosophy, St. Thomas Aquinas|

If the universe were a swarm, there would be no universe. That swarm, that self-caused changing unit, that Godless movable infinite thing would destroy the necessary condition of its own existence and persistence: the individuals that constitute it. Why, then, does modern man insist on not seeing this? Why does he choose rage over reality? [...]

A Second Armenian Genocide

By |2020-10-01T15:41:29-05:00October 1st, 2020|Categories: Death, Europe, Middle East, Politics, War|

One hundred and forty-two years after the Congress of Berlin, the same nightmarish scenario is playing out again: Turkish forces are killing Armenians. And like the Europeans of times past, we just don’t seem to get it. How many Armenians have to die before we understand that life and culture are precious and must [...]

On Conversations, Poisonous Mushrooms, & Taking Ourselves too Seriously

By |2020-06-22T16:41:41-05:00June 22nd, 2020|Categories: Intelligence, Modernity, Natural Law, Philosophy, Reason, Truth|

The natural laws that the academics and intellectuals have for centuries been trying to think and feel out of existence, the laws undergirding all of reality, do not kowtow to the thoughts and actions of mere human beings. They continue to inform reality and will overwhelm anyone who does not bow to them, as [...]

On Fishbowls, Tragedies, and Coronavirus

By |2020-06-08T00:42:32-05:00June 7th, 2020|Categories: Coronavirus, Fiction, Great Books, Literature, Modernity, Tragedy|

Far from calling for microscopic views of reality and fishbowls, tragedies call for us to shatter the fishbowls and throw out the microscopes, to stop obsessing about our vulnerabilities and on how to overcome them, to stop thinking of ourselves as helpless victims of wicked forces. It is a grey day today. The sun [...]

On Descartes, Fear, and the Whys of Our Cultural Woes

By |2020-05-12T01:10:30-05:00May 11th, 2020|Categories: Coronavirus, Culture, Modernity, Philosophy, Reason|

Living in isolation flattens days, homogenizes them. Gone are the trains, the colleagues, the students. Gone the friends, the flights, the lectures. Gone the plans, the urgency, the team. I am no longer flummoxed by the mere thought of Descartes’s mad flight. So here I am back at my desk. It is another day, [...]

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