The Literary Saint, John Henry Newman

By |2020-06-01T14:00:48-05:00May 30th, 2020|Categories: Catholicism, Christianity, Culture, Literature, Religion, Sainthood, St. John Henry Newman, Theology|

John Henry Newman’s life illustrated a truth: It is only through quietly embracing selfless love that human suffering reaches a denouement, epitomized in the life of Christ. When gloom encircles, when hope is extinguishing, it is precisely in that moment Jesus Christ dwells, hunched over and bloodied, carrying his cross to Calvary, in a [...]

Bridging the North-South Divide: Jonathan Edwards and James Thornwell

By |2020-05-01T05:32:46-05:00May 2nd, 2020|Categories: American Republic, American Revolution, Christianity, Civil War, History, Religion, South, Theology|

The narrative of a North-South divide in American History is a powerful, yet problematic one. However, closer metaphysical inspection of both regions uncovers a series of considerable similarities and ironic connections between the Puritans of New England fully embodied in Jonathan Edwards, and the Presbyterians of the Old South fully embodied in James Thornwell. [...]

Freedom from Reality: The Diabolical Character of Modern Liberty

By |2020-04-13T12:30:57-05:00April 12th, 2020|Categories: Books, Christianity, Imagination, Liberty, Philosophy, Religion, Theology|

As our physical and political freedoms are increasingly curtailed by Leviathan due to the Coronavirus pandemic, we are hopefully becoming more aware of the value of what we are losing. Hopefully, it will be the occasion for a more urgent and honest reflection on the true meaning of freedom. Freedom from Reality: The Diabolical [...]

Motion, Moments, & Sculptural Art: The Imagination and Time

By |2020-03-28T18:25:26-05:00March 28th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Imagination, Philosophy, Religion, Theology, Time|

The imagination allows the human experience to be of both motion and stability, both becoming and being—but could it be that contained in our experience of time is an experience of divine nature? In his Consolation of Philosophy, Boethius writes that “the infinite motion of temporal things tries to imitate the ever present immobility [...]

Byzantium’s Orphans, Rome’s Foundlings: The Legacy of the Greek Unionists

By |2020-03-11T13:28:22-05:00March 11th, 2020|Categories: Christendom, Christianity, Culture, History, Religion, Theology, Western Civilization|

The admonitions of Byzantine’s unionists resonate well beyond the Fall of Constantinople—if we had but ears to hear them. Indeed, we today, standing amidst the threatened walls of the house of the West that was once known as Christendom must cherish a culture of Christian solidarity, the conviction that the City of God is [...]

The Rise of Anglo-Catholicism

By |2020-02-15T22:03:03-06:00February 15th, 2020|Categories: Anglicanism, Catholicism, Christianity, Culture, History, Religion, Theology|

On November 4, 2009, Pope Benedict XVI issued an Apostolic Constitution, Anglicanorum Coetibus, in response to “groups of Anglicans” who had petitioned “repeatedly and insistently to be received into full Catholic communion individually as well as corporately,” which created for them a new ecclesiastical structure: the Personal Ordinariates. The stated purpose of these was [...]

On the Fear of Religion

By |2020-02-15T11:44:04-06:00February 15th, 2020|Categories: Atheism, Blaise Pascal, Christianity, Culture, Philosophy, Religion, Senior Contributors, Theology|

Blaise Pascal wrote that men hate religion and “are afraid it is true.” But can we agree with him? Some have made clear a hatred for it, but do they fear it? And what about the wider culture? Do people today, generally speaking, fear religion? The renowned physicist Stephen Hawking once heckled that the [...]

Saint Augustine on Figurative Language in Scripture

By |2020-02-09T02:20:00-06:00February 8th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Christine Norvell, Culture, Education, Religion, Senior Contributors, St. Augustine, Theology|

It’s true that when trying to understanding Scripture we need to establish an analysis of concrete terms. But if we aren’t careful, we just might explain away the beauty of descriptive language the Bible. Saint Augustine of Hippo encountered the same issue, and not just among his youngest students. In humanities coursework, we often [...]

Milton’s Erotic Cosmos

By |2020-02-01T23:21:55-06:00February 1st, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Great Books, Imagination, John Milton, Literature, Paul Krause, Poetry, Senior Contributors, Theology, Uncategorized|

John Milton’s “Paradise Lost” is an intense poem, a passionate poem, an erotic poem. From the visual imagery to the very descriptive language Milton uses to portray his lively scenes to us, there is no escaping the reality of the life force that moves his poem. Why, however, did  Milton choose to write such [...]

The Scandal of Christmas

By |2019-12-22T03:34:19-06:00December 21st, 2019|Categories: Christianity, Christmas, Culture, Dwight Longenecker, Religion, Senior Contributors, Theology|

The Nativity is an outrage. God who is outside of time should not step into time. God the omnipotent should not become a helpless child. God the all-knowing should not empty himself and lock himself into the limitations of mortality. However, it is the incredible outrage of it all that gives one pause. After [...]

The Romantic Theology of Charles Williams

By |2019-12-04T21:15:06-06:00December 4th, 2019|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Christianity, Culture, Inklings, Love, Marriage, Religion, Senior Contributors, Theology|

Just as we consume the Eucharist at Mass, recognizing the holiness of the act, so some marriages become profound examples and witnesses of holiness. By habit and faith, Charles Williams contended, the serious Christian begins to see all meals as a shadow of the Eucharist and all love as a shadow of Holy Matrimony. [...]

The Eucharist and the Imagination

By |2020-01-02T14:25:18-06:00June 29th, 2019|Categories: Catholicism, Christianity, Imagination, Michael De Sapio, Senior Contributors, Theology|

The Christian belief in the Eucharist stands as a universal expression of faith in a transcendent value that exists beyond human effort, to which we can nevertheless strive through faith. It would be hard to find anything in the history of civilization quite like this mystical belief that bound Christians together in communion for [...]

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