Community

Public Opinion in James Bryce’s “The American Commonwealth”

By |2019-08-15T15:09:54-05:00February 7th, 2019|Categories: Books, Community, Democracy, James Bryce, Political Philosophy|

We see that the creation of one’s own opinions is to a large degree a community affair. According to James Bryce, the individual has a powerful role in crafting a nation’s political discourse, but can only be involved in doing so if they act in concert with others. This neither denies the possibility of conflicting [...]

Let Our Kids Play Dangerously!

By |2019-07-23T10:43:42-05:00January 31st, 2019|Categories: Community, Culture, Family|

We have handicapped children by letting our concern for their safety overrule the enormous benefits that come with the way they naturally play... Last semester, some of our faculty recently participated in on-site CPR training on a Saturday morning. And again, this semester, on a Friday evening. Aside from the comfort you should derive knowing [...]

Is Specialization Killing Culture?

By |2019-07-03T13:39:39-05:00January 25th, 2019|Categories: Beauty, Civilization, Community, Culture, Michael De Sapio, Modernity, Permanent Things, Senior Contributors, The Imaginative Conservative, Truth, Western Civilization, Western Tradition|

If culture is simply a matter of private enthusiasms and hobbies, of small details and specialties, then what of a common culture? What about the collective project and shared sense of purpose that built Western civilization? “The expert takes a little subject for his province, and remains a provincial for the rest of his [...]

What Does the War on English Fox Hunting Mean for America?

By |2019-07-23T12:39:02-05:00January 10th, 2019|Categories: Civil Society, Community, Conservatism, Culture, Tradition|

The recent English controversy over the banning of fox hunting has ramifications that go to the heart of the future of the United States. If there are two Englands, rural and urban, there are two Americas also, the red heartland and the blue coastal fringes. The traditional heart of America is threatened by the radical fringe... [...]

Storytelling and Modernity

By |2019-07-16T20:43:16-05:00January 2nd, 2019|Categories: Civil Society, Civilization, Community, Culture, George Stanciu, History, In Honor of Eva Brann at 90 Series, Modernity, Myth, Senior Contributors, Social Order|

The storytelling of a tribe gives each member a common remote past, communal heroes to emulate, shared social rules, and an answer to “Who am I?”  Editor’s Note: This essay is part of a series dedicated to Senior Contributor Dr. Eva Brann of St. John’s College, Annapolis, in this, the year of her 90th [...]

Reductio ad Machinam: Human Identity in the Age of Machines

By |2019-08-01T23:57:35-05:00December 9th, 2018|Categories: Character, Charity, Community, Compassion, Conservatism, Culture, Imagination, Modernity|

"Technique has penetrated the deepest recesses of the human being. The machine tends not only to create a new human environment, but also to modify man's very essence…. He must adapt himself, as though the world were new, to a universe for which he was not created. He was made to go six kilometers an [...]

Edmund Burke and the Calculation of Man

By |2019-06-13T11:30:08-05:00December 7th, 2018|Categories: American Republic, Bradley J. Birzer, Civil Society, Community, Conservatism, Edmund Burke, Edmund Burke series by Bradley Birzer, Politics|

As Edmund Burke began to wind down his very long letter—that which would become 1790’s Reflections on the Revolution in France—he returned to the question of first principles and right reason, especially in regard to the nature of the human person. At his best and most natural, Burke argued, men understood themselves as spirited [...]

The Steam Bath Gathering

By |2018-12-07T09:24:27-05:00December 6th, 2018|Categories: Community, Compassion, Happiness, Hope, Wisdom|

How is it possible to feel happy and sad at the same time? Recently I tasted that bittersweetness as I walked the campus of a college I attended almost 30 years ago. The landmarks of warm memories were still there: majestic buildings, the elegant gym, the cozy dining hall. Then I came to a [...]

Harmony and Order: Giving Thanks

By |2019-07-07T22:53:18-05:00November 21st, 2018|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, Bradley J. Birzer, Christian Living, Community, Leisure, Mayflower Compact, Thanksgiving|

In a season of disharmony, discord, distrust, and disorder, it is often painful to stop, to pause, and to give oneself distance enough to consider what must be recognized as good, and true, and beautiful, even in what seems a cesspool of existence. To give thanks, though, is not only necessary, it is salubrious! In [...]

Can We Restore Civility to America?

By |2019-05-09T11:36:25-05:00November 8th, 2018|Categories: Civil Society, Community, Social Institutions|

This summer and fall, we’ve talked a lot about the decline of civility in our politics—because of growing political polarization, bickering on social media, and rudeness in public spaces. “Every day rudeness, disrespect and hostility sideline collaboration and compromise,” the National Institute for Civil Discourse writes on their website. “Sound bites replace sound journalism. Extremes [...]

Cultivating Friendship in a Fractured Age

By |2019-07-23T11:43:15-05:00November 2nd, 2018|Categories: C.S. Lewis, Christendom, Christian Living, Community, Friendship, G.K. Chesterton, Joseph Pearce, Senior Contributors|

What is friendship? Why is it important and why is it worth cultivating? These axiomatic questions form a significant part of the thought and writing of C. S. Lewis. In a letter to his lifelong friend, Arthur Greeves, Lewis touched upon the heart and meaning of friendship: The First [Universal Friend] is the alter [...]

The Glorious Inefficiency of Local Bookstores

By |2019-06-17T15:43:00-05:00October 21st, 2018|Categories: Books, Bookstore, Christianity, Community, Culture, Timeless Essays|

Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords readers the opportunity to join Dean Abbott as he considers the importance of the small, local bookstore to civilization. —W. Winston Elliott III, Publisher Our family lives in the kind of town most people only see in fiction: an archetypal, small, Midwestern town of picket fences and blocks [...]

The Eternal Community of Russell Kirk

By |2019-04-23T15:42:19-05:00October 19th, 2018|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Community, Conservatism, Russell Kirk|

Russell Kirk never liked the word individualism, believing it both an incorrect way to understand the human person as well as aesthetically unattractive. Having read much of the great German and French Christian humanists in the 1940s and 1950s, Kirk accepted only the language of “personhood” and “personalism,” even in his long, pre-Catholic days. Indeed, [...]