Why Did Ex-Churchgoers Flock to Donald Trump?

By |2019-01-29T14:11:15-06:00January 29th, 2019|Categories: Christendom, Christianity, Donald Trump, Politics, Religion, Social Institutions|

When Donald Trump caught so many political commentators off guard, we looked for an explanation amid the closing factories, but we should have been looking for the closing churches… If you’ve ever been to a Donald Trump rally, you’ll notice it doesn’t match the impression left by the media coverage of the president’s base. [...]

The Sirens of Certainty

By |2019-07-09T13:29:54-05:00January 22nd, 2019|Categories: Christendom, Christianity, Conservatism, Culture, Dwight Longenecker, Modernity, Religion, Senior Contributors, Tradition|

The sirens tempted unwary sailors towards the rocks with their enchanting song and alluring loveliness. They often stand for the lusts of the flesh, but their destructive allure perhaps more powerfully stands for the seductive enchantment of primitivism, fundamentalism, and restorationism. […]

Uncle Sam’s Good Servant But God’s First

By |2019-01-13T22:05:07-06:00January 13th, 2019|Categories: Christendom, Christianity, Civil Society, Faith, Joseph Pearce, Nationalism, Patriotism, Secularism, Senior Contributors|

In order to truly serve their nation, true Americans must fearlessly criticize her for her waywardness. More importantly, we must evangelize her, bringing her to the fullness of faith in the God under Whom she owes her existence. Only when America kneels before her true God will she become truly civilized… One of the [...]

Thomas More on Conscience, Courage, & the Comedy of Politics

By |2019-06-13T12:38:35-05:00December 29th, 2018|Categories: Christendom, Christian Humanism, Civil Society, England, History, Natural Law, Philosophy, Politics, Thomas More, Wisdom|

As the gulf between classical and postmodern notions of conscience and government grows ever wider and their clashes more explosive, it is high time for the jury to give renewed attention to the nuances of Thomas More’s understanding of the apparently competing, but ultimately harmonious, demands of divine, natural, and human law… In August of 1534 Margaret [...]

“The God in the Cave”

By |2018-12-21T02:55:29-06:00December 24th, 2018|Categories: Christendom, Christianity, Christmas, Existence of God, G.K. Chesterton, Myth, Philosophy, Religion, Truth|

This sketch of the human story began in a cave; the cave which popular science associates with the cave-man and in which practical discovery has really found archaic drawings of animals. The second half of human history, which was like a new creation of the world, also begins in a cave. There is even a [...]

Freedom, Truth, and Human Dignity

By |2019-06-13T10:56:13-05:00December 19th, 2018|Categories: Christendom, Christian Humanism, Christianity, Communio, David L. Schindler, Politics|

Catholics are generally aware that the background preparations for what was to become the Council’s Declaration on Religious Freedom emphasized that truth alone had rights, and that error was at best to be tolerated. Catholics are also generally aware that, after the early debates regarding religious freedom, the Council shifted its emphasis away from the [...]

Home and Hearth: A Cautionary Christmas With Washington Irving

By |2018-12-08T00:35:23-06:00December 6th, 2018|Categories: Advent, Books, Charles Dickens, Christendom, Christianity, Christine Norvell, Christmas, G.K. Chesterton, Literature, Senior Contributors|

In the 1820s, Washington Irving was credited with inspiring the romantic revival of Christmas in America. His Sketchbook of Geoffrey Crayon, Gentleman relayed sentimental tales of the British holiday with all its romance and traditions. The five Christmas tales were later published in 1875 as a separate collection titled Old Christmas.* Having lived in London and its [...]

Winning the Long Defeat

By |2018-11-28T21:55:23-06:00November 28th, 2018|Categories: Catholicism, Christendom, Christianity, Conservatism, Culture War, Freedom of Religion, Heroism, Joseph Pearce, Modernity, Sainthood|

Actually I am a Christian, and indeed a Roman Catholic, so that I do not expect “history” to be anything but a “long defeat”—though it contains… some samples or glimpses of final victory. – J.R.R. Tolkien Together through ages of the world we have fought the long defeat. – Galadriel My kingdom is not of this [...]

Great Books, Higher Education, and the Logos

By |2018-11-26T09:45:40-06:00November 4th, 2018|Categories: Christendom, Education, Great Books, Liberal Learning, Timeless Essays|

The ends of higher education are the acquisition of wisdom and virtue and the serious pursuit of knowledge and truth. Reading the Great Books helps us to get to these ends. Informed by the wisdom, the beauty, the goodness, and the truth we encounter in Great Books, we can responsibly and humanely practice our vocation [...]

Cultivating Friendship in a Fractured Age

By |2019-07-23T11:43:15-05:00November 2nd, 2018|Categories: C.S. Lewis, Christendom, Christian Living, Community, Friendship, G.K. Chesterton, Joseph Pearce, Senior Contributors|

What is friendship? Why is it important and why is it worth cultivating? These axiomatic questions form a significant part of the thought and writing of C. S. Lewis. In a letter to his lifelong friend, Arthur Greeves, Lewis touched upon the heart and meaning of friendship: The First [Universal Friend] is the alter [...]

Columbus the Exemplar

By |2018-10-16T20:23:52-05:00October 7th, 2018|Categories: Christendom, Culture, History, Leadership, RAK, Russell Kirk, Timeless Essays|

Christopher Columbus offers us the example of those virtues that the old Romans called fortitude and constancy; and the example of those virtues that the early Christians called faith and hope... Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords readers the opportunity to join Russell Kirk as he considers the character and legacy of the [...]

The Augustine Option: A Third Way?

By |2019-06-06T12:17:44-05:00September 8th, 2018|Categories: Christendom, Christian Humanism, Christianity, Conservatism, Culture, St. Augustine|

If we are indeed witnessing the nadir of American politics—or at least its accelerating decline—we should listen closely to Augustine. The “Augustine Option,” meaning a life lived in the final years of Rome, can offer key insights into how we should understand and address these tumultuous times... To the continued debate over whether religious Americans [...]