Cursive and the Brave New World

By |2021-05-08T14:58:34-05:00May 8th, 2021|Categories: Glenn Arbery, Language, Science, Senior Contributors, Space, Writing, Wyoming Catholic College|

Once mastered, cursive enables us to write rapidly without lifting the pen from the paper—a skill that has major advantages over printing. Cursive now stumps many college students today. Whether it can ever make a comeback seems to be an issue. At about 10 o’clock the other night, my wife called me out of my [...]

The Abyss of Grievance

By |2021-04-30T11:49:37-05:00May 1st, 2021|Categories: Christianity, Culture, Ethnicity, Glenn Arbery, Politics, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

No question, the history of race in America is a vexed one. There are real wrongs to address, certainly, but there is also a persistent state of grievance, a kind of moral or spiritual condition, in which one eschews peace of mind, an abyss of soul where one relives injustices done or imagines the goods [...]

Fields of Culture

By |2021-04-27T20:25:41-05:00April 17th, 2021|Categories: Community, Culture, Glenn Arbery, Liberal Learning, Wyoming Catholic College|

The culture of a real community like that of college isn’t simply a matter of texts and discussions of ideas, but of live emotion and thought, real presence to each other, a continuous awareness and exchange that locates each person in the larger community. Yesterday afternoon, during one of our regular meetings with the freshman [...]

Easter for Misfits

By |2021-04-27T20:36:02-05:00April 9th, 2021|Categories: Christianity, Easter, Flannery O'Connor, Glenn Arbery, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

For those doing all right by themselves like Flannery O’Connor’s Misfit, Christ’s Resurrection from the dead throws everything off balance because it introduces something entirely new. To believe the testimony of the Gospels opens avenues to happiness that are entirely discomfiting to the complacency of mere identity. Flannery O’Connor had a way of compressing whole [...]

Shakespeare’s Rome

By |2021-04-27T22:01:26-05:00March 26th, 2021|Categories: Glenn Arbery, Great Books, Rome, Senior Contributors, William Shakespeare, Wyoming Catholic College|

Rome does not occasionally become relevant in our understanding of political upheaval. Rather, it forms part of our very identity as Christians and heirs of the Western tradition that it helped shape. No one saw the essential drama of Rome more clearly than William Shakespeare. In the current issue of Atlantic magazine, editor-at-large Cullen Murphy [...]

Edmund Burke and the Progressive Mind

By |2021-03-19T15:14:54-05:00March 19th, 2021|Categories: Edmund Burke, Glenn Arbery, Great Books, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

Not swayed by popular enthusiasm, Edmund Burke was the first substantial thinker to address the full-blown entrance of radical ideas into the political sphere and the first to express a truly conservative umbrage at the imposition of abstractions onto a world of particular, distinctive circumstances. Juniors at Wyoming Catholic College have just read in Humanities [...]

The Legacy of John Senior

By |2021-03-12T10:02:49-06:00March 11th, 2021|Categories: Catholicism, Education, Humanities, John Senior, Joseph Pearce, Liberal Learning, Senior Contributors|

At the heart of John Senior’s vision for the humanities was a Thomistic understanding of the path of true perception. St. Thomas taught that humility opens the eyes of wonder, and that it is wonder that leads to contemplation and to the dilation of the mind and soul into the fullness of the presence of [...]

Where Babies Come From

By |2021-02-27T15:17:20-06:00February 27th, 2021|Categories: Abortion, Family, Glenn Arbery, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

We love God, follow the reason implicit in sexual nature, and consider having children the greatest privilege bestowed on us, the greatest of gifts. Each child is a huge promise, a new world aborning, and I cannot imagine a financial anxiety so serious that it would make anyone think otherwise. In one of the customs [...]

A Deeper Lent

By |2021-02-19T13:50:09-06:00February 20th, 2021|Categories: Christianity, Glenn Arbery, Lent, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

The season of Lent is superimposed upon the life of work that we already lead, but here, more than ever, the pressing need is for silence, renunciation, and the leisure of deep work in prayer and spiritual reflection, achieved without deadlines or anxiety. Back before the students returned to Wyoming Catholic College this semester, I [...]

Why Literature Matters

By |2021-02-05T12:12:02-06:00February 5th, 2021|Categories: Education, Glenn Arbery, Great Books, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

Simply speaking, literature works with the mode of thought most natural to the human mind—that is, thinking in images, comparisons, characters, speeches, and actions. Every household of parents and children has a cast of distinct characters whose various performances become stories in the family. Our five-year-old grandson Andrew, for example, though a domestic terrorist by [...]

Shakespeare and “Hateful Rhetoric”

By |2021-01-29T15:11:50-06:00January 29th, 2021|Categories: Education, Glenn Arbery, Great Books, Politics, Senior Contributors, William Shakespeare, Wyoming Catholic College|

In the current battle for the classroom between traditional literature and overt propaganda, #DisruptTexts and its allies attack Shakespeare for hate speech. But is Shakespeare promulgating hateful rhetoric? Or is he thinking deeply into the dramatic situation of racial and religious conflict in the Mediterranean world to reveal the human heart in conflict with itself? [...]

Living at This Hour

By |2021-01-22T09:54:37-06:00January 22nd, 2021|Categories: Glenn Arbery, Government, John Milton, Literature, Poetry, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

Even without the content of the general historical frame, William Wordsworth’s sonnet, “London 1802,” is moving to every generation that reads it, and it is natural to compare our current political situation with the one described in the poem. All of us, of course, remember the dire circumstances of England in 1802. No? Then we [...]

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