Legalizing the Resurrection

By |2020-04-09T12:22:45-05:00April 10th, 2020|Categories: Conservatism, Easter, Glenn Arbery, Modernity, Religion, Senior Contributors, Timeless Essays, Wyoming Catholic College|

Many in our society consider religion merely an instrument of power, and they believe that the “correction” of inherited beliefs and practices can be forced upon the unwilling. But there’s an enormous difference between people who choose the real common good and people forced to submit to a state ideology. Today’s offering in our [...]

Moving Toward Dread Conformity

By |2020-04-10T11:06:40-05:00April 8th, 2020|Categories: Books, Bradley J. Birzer, Civil Society, Civilization, Conservatism, Robert Nisbet, Senior Contributors|

In 1953, Robert Nisbet published “The Quest for Community,” a book that reveals to us that our own quest has become something both natural and unnatural. That is, it is natural to desire to belong, but it is horrifically unnatural in the ways we choose to commune. 1953 was a banner year for the [...]

Liberty and Democracy in Western Civilization

By |2020-04-02T11:04:54-05:00April 8th, 2020|Categories: Audio/Video, Christianity, Conservatism, Liberty, Roger Scruton, Western Civilization|

The late, great conservative philosopher, Sir Roger Scruton, delivers the keynote address at the Institute of Public Affairs' 2014 Foundations of Western Civilization Symposium. He discusses the topics of freedom of speech, freedom of conscience, and the pursuit of truth. —Editor This essay in our series of “Timeless Essays” was first published here in August [...]

George Santayana and the Ironies of Liberalism

By |2020-04-06T12:07:25-05:00April 7th, 2020|Categories: Conservatism, Liberalism, Philosophy, Political Philosophy, Politics|

The question—is liberalism a self-defeating enterprise?—has gained traction over the last couple of years. Even as far back as 1921, the Spanish-American philosopher George Santayana dedicated time to this topic in the form of an essay he titled “The Irony of Liberalism.” In this brief work, Santayana explored prevalent themes that emerged throughout liberalism’s [...]

T-Rexit: Is the EU Evolving Towards its Own Extinction?

By |2020-04-06T15:51:45-05:00April 6th, 2020|Categories: Conservatism, Coronavirus, Europe, Government, Joseph Pearce, Politics, Senior Contributors|

When nations under the European Union close their borders to protect their people from the coronavirus, the pomposity of the EU is exposed. This is a telling sign that its serpentine grip on its empire is slipping. On April 2, the Court of Justice of the European Union, the EU’s “supreme court,” ruled that [...]

What is the Purpose of 21st-Century Conservatism?

By |2020-03-31T17:03:47-05:00March 31st, 2020|Categories: Conservatism, Tradition, Western Civilization|

Conservatism is confronted by the existential question of its own philosophy: what is left to conserve? Indeed, is there anything worth conserving? I think there are positive answers to this—the nation being the foremost—but that is a concern for another time. Here, I want to make the point that conservatism, beyond the substantive vision [...]

Old Rowan Oak: William Faulkner’s Conservatism

By |2020-03-31T17:15:52-05:00March 31st, 2020|Categories: Books, Conservatism, Literature, South|

Russell Kirk’s Ten Conservative Principles reflect the way William Faulkner wrote, acted, and organized his life. As a property owner with notions of limited government, he brought that orientation to his fiction, to his work in Hollywood, to his commentary on civil rights, and to his everyday relationships with his family and community. His [...]

Building American Institutions During a Cultural Crisis

By |2020-03-29T18:36:22-05:00March 29th, 2020|Categories: Books, Civil Society, Conservatism, Culture War, Social Institutions|

In his latest book, Yuval Levin presents irrefutable evidence of America’s weakening attachment to its core institutions of family, community, voluntary associations, religions, and political parties. His goal, however, is to move beyond today’s ideological culture war and show how commitment to institutions puts us on an edifying path to belonging, social status, personal [...]

Cleaning Up the Immigration Mess in 4 Simple (But Not Easy) Steps

By |2020-03-22T17:53:18-05:00March 22nd, 2020|Categories: Citizenship, Conservatism, Immigration, Politics|

All Americans would probably agree that the current immigration situation is a mess. The proof of this is that no one can discuss the issue without having to defend something awful. Immigration hawks must argue for separating families and deporting people who contribute to the economy while immigration supporters have to account for the [...]

Eric Voegelin, Conservative?

By |2020-03-20T12:25:49-05:00March 20th, 2020|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Conservatism, Eric Voegelin, Political Philosophy, Senior Contributors|

Whatever his criticisms of liberalism, progressivism, and socialism, Eric Voegelin shunned the word and the concept of “conservatism,” claiming that his ideas could never be harnessed by any political movement. When the definitive history of non-leftist movements of the twentieth century is finally written, Austro-American philosopher, Eric Voegelin (1901-1985) will loom large. Arrested by [...]

Did Edmund Burke Support the American Revolution?

By |2020-03-17T17:36:43-05:00March 17th, 2020|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, Bradley J. Birzer, Conservatism, Declaration of Independence, Edmund Burke, History, Independence Day, Robert Nisbet, Russell Kirk, Senior Contributors|

Many conservatives have assumed that Edmund Burke was opposed to the American Revolution. It is, to my mind, an erroneous assumption. “Burke broke his agentship and went publicly silent on the American cause once war broke out,” Robert Nisbet claimed in his most definitive analysis of Edmund Burke, written and published in 1985. His [...]

The Shortcomings of Libertarianism

By |2020-03-15T00:38:53-05:00March 15th, 2020|Categories: Communism, Conservatism, Libertarianism, Politics|

In our new social paradigm, moral confusion abounds. Two popular ideologies—Marxism and Libertarianism—attempt to address this confusion. However, neither accounts for the fundamentally social nature of the human person: the way shared values conceive culture and art, how the primacy of belief binds communities together, or that we are born knowing we were created [...]

T.S. Eliot as Conservative Mentor

By |2020-03-16T00:18:52-05:00March 15th, 2020|Categories: Conservatism, Roger Scruton, T.S. Eliot, Timeless Essays|

Should modern man devote himself like Sartre to undermining bourgeois society and scoffing at manners and morals? Should he play the part of Socrates, questioning everything and affirming nothing? To answer yes to any of those questions is to grant nothing to human life beyond the mockery of it. T.S. Eliot’s solution was to embrace [...]