The Literary Saint, John Henry Newman

By |2020-06-01T14:00:48-05:00May 30th, 2020|Categories: Catholicism, Christianity, Culture, Literature, Religion, Sainthood, St. John Henry Newman, Theology|

John Henry Newman’s life illustrated a truth: It is only through quietly embracing selfless love that human suffering reaches a denouement, epitomized in the life of Christ. When gloom encircles, when hope is extinguishing, it is precisely in that moment Jesus Christ dwells, hunched over and bloodied, carrying his cross to Calvary, in a [...]

Christopher Dawson and the Religious Impulse

By |2020-05-23T17:30:06-05:00May 23rd, 2020|Categories: Books, Christianity, Christopher Dawson, Civilization, Culture, Government, History, Religion|

How does religion act as a driving force of politics and culture? Christoper Dawson argued that “we cannot understand the inner form of a society unless we understand its religion,” and we cannot make sense of any culture or its achievements without knowing the religious inspiration from which its creativity flowed. Imagine a diagram [...]

“Lord, Teach Us to Pray”: Reflections on Fulton Sheen

By |2020-05-24T10:02:23-05:00May 23rd, 2020|Categories: Books, Catholicism, Christianity, Culture, Religion|

When I was a child, my mother would regularly put my brothers and me to sleep by playing Fulton Sheen talks on tape and (later) on CD. I remember marveling first at the man’s voice, its weathered timbre and solemn cadence and massive fluctuations in volume. What held my attention next were the stories: [...]

Charles De Gaulle as Catholic Military Exemplar

By |2020-05-23T17:35:57-05:00May 23rd, 2020|Categories: Catholicism, Character, Christianity, Culture, Europe, History, Religion|

The memory of General Charles de Gaulle has largely faded away, like a fleeting dream, from the soul of the French nation. Nonetheless, his example serves as a testament to those men and women in uniform of the endless grace that flows from the Catholic faith, and which is required to continue the eternal [...]

A Monster and the Mask

By |2020-05-22T17:48:52-05:00May 22nd, 2020|Categories: Catholicism, Christianity, Culture, Dante, Dwight Longenecker, Religion, Senior Contributors|

Dante’s ugly, shapeshifting demon, Geryon, is all around us, covering his rage with a facade of love, compassion, and concern. He is also within us. And this is a truth we must bring to light, because, without it, we cannot really understand the depth and grim reality of the Christian faith. “Behold the beast [...]

Confronting the Heart of Darkness

By |2020-05-25T11:20:22-05:00May 19th, 2020|Categories: Books, Christian Living, Christianity, Dwight Longenecker, Imagination, Joseph Pearce, Literature, Religion, Senior Contributors, War|

Immortal Combat: Confronting the Heart of Darkness, by Dwight Longenecker (160 pages, Sophia Institute Press, 2020) It was, I believe, C.S. Lewis who said, speaking of the mediaeval mind and culture, that “the very air was thick with angels.” If, however, angels are real and not merely figments of the imagination, mediaeval or otherwise, [...]

“For the Journey”

By |2020-05-17T01:05:02-05:00May 17th, 2020|Categories: Catholicism, Imagination, Poetry, Religion|

When my father was in World War II, after which he received orders for other assignments that took him away from home for long periods of time, I resided with my maternal grandmother. She had emigrated from Sicily and lived in this country for over 60 years (but refused to learn English, considering it [...]

Religious Liberty in an Age of Pandemic

By |2020-05-16T20:17:34-05:00May 16th, 2020|Categories: American Republic, Constitution, First Amendment, Freedom, Liberty, Politics, Religion|

Is our nation witnessing a soft form of religious persecution beneath the cloak of public health? I pray and hope that this is not the case and that governments, preventing the free exercise of religion, will reverse course and allow church leaders to reopen their doors to once again proceed with the most essential [...]

A Republic If You Can Keep It: Religion, Civil Society, & America’s Founding

By |2020-06-22T12:07:33-05:00May 9th, 2020|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, Civil Society, Morality, Religion, Virtue|

Though civil libertarians rightly point out the dangers of an unchecked government, they blissfully ignore the dangers of an unchecked, unrestrained populace. It is thus worthwhile to return to the founders and examine what role they desired religion and morality to play in their new Republic. The story goes that as Benjamin Franklin departed [...]

A Christian Critique of Secular Progressivism

By |2020-05-08T18:26:03-05:00May 8th, 2020|Categories: Civilization, Culture, History, Philosophy, Progressivism, Religion, Time|

The end of history concept—the belief that there will be an endpoint to social, intellectual, and political progress—is a powerful idea that pervades modern-day secular thought. The spread of gay rights, the rise of universal government-run health insurance, and environmental awareness has hubristically led “progressive” secularists to describe a coming “Age of Enlightenment” when [...]

Can No One Be Left Alone? The Little Sisters of the Poor Case

By |2020-05-05T17:42:45-05:00May 5th, 2020|Categories: American Republic, Constitution, First Amendment, Government, Politics, Religion, Senior Contributors, Thomas R. Ascik|

The Catholic order of nuns, the Little Sisters of the Poor, are apparently not little enough or poor enough to avoid governmental coercion and interference with their works of charity. For almost a decade now, they have been involved in court cases resisting governmental attempts, first federal and now state, to require them to [...]

Bridging the North-South Divide: Jonathan Edwards and James Thornwell

By |2020-05-01T05:32:46-05:00May 2nd, 2020|Categories: American Republic, American Revolution, Christianity, Civil War, History, Religion, South, Theology|

The narrative of a North-South divide in American History is a powerful, yet problematic one. However, closer metaphysical inspection of both regions uncovers a series of considerable similarities and ironic connections between the Puritans of New England fully embodied in Jonathan Edwards, and the Presbyterians of the Old South fully embodied in James Thornwell. [...]

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