An Intellectual Father to the End: Edward E. Ericson, Jr.

By |2020-11-04T14:01:38-06:00November 5th, 2020|Categories: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, David Deavel, Liberal Learning, Literature, Senior Contributors|

Professor Edward E. Ericson, Jr. was an intellectual father to me. He shared the belief of the Russians that great literature can change lives, and that true literature which does not forget God or man or the particularities of life is ultimately more powerful than politics or even political philosophy. It might be mom or [...]

Our Hero: Socrates in the Underworld

By |2020-05-13T15:58:07-05:00March 24th, 2020|Categories: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Books, Essential, Peter A. Lawler, Senior Contributors, Socrates, Timeless Essays, Truth|

Socrates in the Underworld: On Plato’s Gorgias, by Nalin Ranasinghe (192 pages, St. Augustine Press, 2009) Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords readers the opportunity to join Peter Augustine Lawler as he reflects on how Socrates models both rightly-ordered eros and logos, in contrast to the Stoics and Sophists. —W. Winston Elliott III, Publisher [...]

HBO’s “Chernobyl” and Solzhenitsyn

By |2019-12-12T01:56:31-06:00December 10th, 2019|Categories: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Civilization, Communism, Culture, History, Ideology, Television|

The new HBO series “Chernobyl” serves to warn us about the danger of persistent lies in a society that refuses to acknowledge truth. It would be a grave error not to take stock of our own tendencies toward deceit, as if our lies are radically different from those that underpinned the Soviet Union. Over several [...]

Why Did the Berlin Wall Fall?

By |2020-11-09T00:28:02-06:00November 8th, 2019|Categories: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Barbara J. Elliott, Communism, Europe, Poland, Russia, Senior Contributors, Timeless Essays|

The Berlin Wall and the Iron Curtain seemed to be permanent fixtures of the political landscape of Europe after 1961. But to everyone’s surprise, the Berlin Wall opened on November 9, 1989. This stunning event triggered a chain reaction throughout Eastern Europe, accelerating a process that had begun a decade earlier. Using a little poetic [...]

Seeing the West as a Millstone: Sketches of Solzhenitsyn in Exile

By |2020-12-10T15:45:19-06:00October 16th, 2019|Categories: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Conservatism, Democracy, Joseph Pearce, Literature, Political Philosophy, Politics, Senior Contributors, Western Civilization|

“Sketches of Exile” is a real gift for those who admire Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, enabling us to see his first years of exile, in Switzerland and the United States, through his eyes. We should be grateful for these sketches and the insight they offer, as well as for their glimpses of the lovable man behind the publicly [...]

The Dangers of Russophobia

By |2019-02-27T13:37:45-06:00February 24th, 2019|Categories: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Character, Communism, Government, Joseph Pearce, Political Philosophy, Politics, Russia, Senior Contributors|

We should not confuse or conflate Russian President Vladimir Putin with Soviet leaders, such as Josef Stalin. They are as different as the proverbial chalk and cheese. Nowhere is this more evident than the way in which Mr. Putin has shown himself to be a great admirer of the anti-Soviet dissident, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. The Special [...]

Solzhenitsyn 1918-2018: A Centenary Celebration

By |2019-09-28T09:49:53-05:00December 11th, 2018|Categories: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Books, Character, Christianity, Heroism, History, Hope, Joseph Pearce, Senior Contributors, StAR|

The twentieth century produced many giants and many heroes. Yet many of the giants were not heroes, and many of the heroes were not giants. Hitler was a giant, as were Lenin, Stalin, and Mao. Each of these Nietzschean supermen was responsible for the deaths of millions of people. As for the heroes, one thinks [...]

Jane Austen Forever!

By |2020-07-17T18:06:00-05:00November 28th, 2018|Categories: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Books, Classics, Culture, Education, Fiction, Jane Austen, Literature, Television|

Pick up a Jane Austen novel, and you will discover that behind the long gowns and country dances, people in her era struggled with the same weaknesses we struggle with today. Well-written stories like Austen’s bring to life the human drama that is played out in every age, in every heart. I’ve been reading Jane [...]

Putin and Solzhenitsyn

By |2020-07-26T01:09:56-05:00August 20th, 2018|Categories: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Books, Film, History, Joseph Pearce, Politics, Russia|

In Vladimir Putin’s Russia, the greatest classic of anti-communist literature, Alexander Solzhenitsyn's "The Gulag Archipelago," is now compulsory reading in all high schools. We don’t need to like Vladimir Putin. We don’t need to admire him. But we do need to acknowledge that Russia has moved on from the evils of socialism, even as we [...]

The Legacy of Alexander Solzhenitsyn

By |2019-08-06T15:53:50-05:00May 11th, 2018|Categories: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Books, Christianity, History, Joseph Pearce|

The scholarship of Lee Congdon’s Solzhenitsyn: The Historical-Spiritual Destinies of Russia and the West is sound, demonstrating a breadth of knowledge and a depth of understanding of Alexander Solzhenitsyn’s worldview… Solzhenitsyn: The Historical-Spiritual Destinies of Russia and the West by Lee Congdon (164 pages, Northern Illinois University Press, 2017) This December will mark the centenary of the birth [...]

The Armenian Genocide

By |2018-04-14T22:07:14-05:00April 14th, 2018|Categories: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Books, Death, History, Joseph Pearce|

“Who today still speaks of the annihilation of the Armenians?” Who, one wonders, would ask such a question? The answer, surprisingly enough, is a certain Adolf Hitler who asked it rhetorically as a means of justifying the German invasion of Poland in 1939. The annihilation to which Hitler referred was the Armenian Genocide perpetrated by [...]

Learning to Be “Dinosaurs”

By |2019-03-26T16:45:35-05:00December 22nd, 2017|Categories: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Books, Christianity, Conservatism, History, Literature|

A rare breed of humans knows the limits of its time and is less concerned with its immediate relevancy and more with what it leaves behind. If we are to cultivate a similar vision, we must learn to be such “dinosaurs”… Edward E. Ericson, Jr., was a dinosaur. When I call Ericson a dinosaur, I’m [...]

Solzhenitsyn on Russia and the West

By |2018-12-04T12:40:13-06:00May 2nd, 2017|Categories: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Featured, Foreign Affairs, G.K. Chesterton, Hilaire Belloc, Joseph Pearce, Literature, Russia|

There are moves afoot to whip up the old Cold War angst and anger and to resurrect enmity towards Russia. Liberals in the West, outraged at Russia’s resistance to their decadent agenda, are caricaturing Russia as an enemy of Western “values”… In 1998 I had the inestimable pleasure and honour of interviewing Alexander Solzhenitsyn at [...]

What Does Chesterton Have To Do with Solzhenitsyn?

By |2018-11-09T11:35:32-06:00September 1st, 2016|Categories: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Distributism, G.K. Chesterton, Joseph Pearce, Senior Contributors|

At first sight, it would seem that G.K. Chesterton and Alexander Solzhenitsyn have very little in common. The one has a reputation for jollity and rambunctiousness, the other for sobriety and solemn sternness. One penned swashbuckling fantasies about lovable eccentrics, the other wrote gritty works of realism set in prison camps or cancer wards. Although [...]

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