Death on Drum: Gerard Manley Hopkins & the Mystery of Suffering

By |2021-02-12T15:38:30-06:00February 12th, 2021|Categories: Death, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Joseph Pearce, Literature, Poetry, Senior Contributors|

Prompted to compose his marvelous tour de force, “The Wreck of the Deutschland,” after reading the report of a shipwreck off the coast of England, the priest-poet Gerard Manley Hopkins gives one of the most profound and penetrating meditations on the mystery of suffering. The mystery of suffering, or the problem of pain as C.S. Lewis [...]

How We Split the World Apart: The Separation of Faith & Philosophy

By |2021-02-11T13:49:45-06:00February 11th, 2021|Categories: E.B., Eva Brann, Faith, Philosophy, Religion, Senior Contributors, Theology|

This is an edited version of a conversation between Eva Brann, the longest-serving tutor at St. John’s College, and Hamza Yusuf, President of Zaytuna College, recorded in March 2019. You can listen to the full podcast here. Hamza Yusuf: We’re really fortunate today to have with us, I think, one of the treasures of our [...]

Is “Christian Humanism” Gone Forever?

By |2021-02-11T13:00:07-06:00February 11th, 2021|Categories: Books, Bradley J. Birzer, C.S. Lewis, Christian Humanism, Senior Contributors, T.S. Eliot|

In his book “The Year of Our Lord 1943,” writing on Christian humanism, Alan Jacobs considers the fears and desires of five major but seemingly disparate figures in 1943 as they envision a post-war world after an allied victory: W.H. Auden, T.S. Eliot, C.S. Lewis, Jacques Maritain, and Simone Weil. The Year of Our Lord [...]

Christ Figures in “The Lord of the Rings”

By |2021-02-08T11:02:13-06:00February 8th, 2021|Categories: Catholicism, Christianity, J.R.R. Tolkien, Joseph Pearce, Senior Contributors|

In “The Lord of the Rings,” the One Ring and the One Sin are symbolic similitudes. As the One Ring is “unmade” on Mount Doom, so the One Sin is “unmade” on the hill of Golgotha, the place of the skull. Therefore, if the Ring is synonymous with sin in general and Original Sin in [...]

Ecumenical Truth Versus the Falsehoods of Ecumenism

By |2021-02-06T08:23:48-06:00February 6th, 2021|Categories: Christianity, Joseph Pearce, Language, Religion, Senior Contributors, Theology, Truth|

The authentic definition of “ecumenical” has nothing to do with the modern understanding of “ecumenism,” which appears to be the willingness to dilute or delete doctrine in pursuit of a perceived unity among disparate groups of believers. Being ecumenical is being evangelical, whereas the new-fangled word ecumenism is the failure to evangelize. It is important [...]

Robert Nisbet’s Youth

By |2021-02-05T11:05:29-06:00February 5th, 2021|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Robert Nisbet, Senior Contributors|

Growing up in Maricopa, the young Robert Nisbet fell deeply in love with libraries. Almost as soon as he learned to read—sitting on his mother’s lap as she read to him—the young man began to devour books voraciously, loving the literature of the Age of Coolidge. Though proudly possessing the Confederate soul of a southern [...]

Why Literature Matters

By |2021-02-05T12:12:02-06:00February 5th, 2021|Categories: Education, Glenn Arbery, Great Books, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

Simply speaking, literature works with the mode of thought most natural to the human mind—that is, thinking in images, comparisons, characters, speeches, and actions. Every household of parents and children has a cast of distinct characters whose various performances become stories in the family. Our five-year-old grandson Andrew, for example, though a domestic terrorist by [...]

Euripides: Poet-Prophet of Pity

By |2021-02-03T16:32:16-06:00February 3rd, 2021|Categories: Death, Great Books, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors, Theater, War|

Responding to the great bloodshed of young men, women, and virgins he experienced during the Peloponnesian War, Euripides exposes the horrors of war and its damaging effects on humans, particularly on women, in his war plays. Euripides’s dramatic tragedies appeal to our sense of pity and call for peace. The acme of Euripides’s literary genius [...]

Is Christianity a Story?

By |2021-02-01T20:41:07-06:00February 2nd, 2021|Categories: Books, Christianity, Faith, Michael De Sapio, Myth, Reason, Senior Contributors, Theology|

If we accept that Christianity is a story, emphasize the primacy of faith, and deemphasize historical testimony, are we not merely reduced to telling our different stories, without being able to point to anything as having compelling objective truth? The mythopoetic appeal of Christianity is strong and valid. Yet there has to be something that [...]

The Gentle Genius of Thomas Howard

By |2021-01-29T12:01:09-06:00February 1st, 2021|Categories: Christianity, Imagination, Joseph Pearce, Philosophy, Senior Contributors|

Chivalrous and self-effacing in a completely genuine and unconscious way, Thomas Howard was a bona fide gentleman, in the old-fashioned sense of the word. He was a walking witness of all that is good and gracious in life, serving as a tacit reminder of goodness, truth, and beauty. Thomas Howard When Thomas Howard [...]

Shakespeare and “Hateful Rhetoric”

By |2021-01-29T15:11:50-06:00January 29th, 2021|Categories: Education, Glenn Arbery, Great Books, Politics, Senior Contributors, William Shakespeare, Wyoming Catholic College|

In the current battle for the classroom between traditional literature and overt propaganda, #DisruptTexts and its allies attack Shakespeare for hate speech. But is Shakespeare promulgating hateful rhetoric? Or is he thinking deeply into the dramatic situation of racial and religious conflict in the Mediterranean world to reveal the human heart in conflict with itself? [...]

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