Innocence Lost: Reading Nineteenth-Century American Literature

By |2021-03-02T00:45:37-06:00March 2nd, 2021|Categories: American Republic, Conservatism, Great Books, Herman Melville, Liberalism, Literature, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors|

In the wellspring of classic nineteenth-century American literature, a spectacular theme unites our greatest authors. They, in various ways, challenge the naïve optimism of the “American Adam” and American liberalism. They are deeply conservative in their skepticism toward human and civilizational progress and perfection. It is true that the classics, especially Virgil and Cicero, along [...]

Euripides: Poet-Prophet of Pity

By |2021-02-03T16:32:16-06:00February 3rd, 2021|Categories: Death, Great Books, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors, Theater, War|

Responding to the great bloodshed of young men, women, and virgins he experienced during the Peloponnesian War, Euripides exposes the horrors of war and its damaging effects on humans, particularly on women, in his war plays. Euripides’s dramatic tragedies appeal to our sense of pity and call for peace. The acme of Euripides’s literary genius [...]

Sensing the Dangers of Romantic Sensibility

By |2021-01-18T12:09:46-06:00January 19th, 2021|Categories: Great Books, Jane Austen, Literature, Love, Paul Krause, Reason, Senior Contributors|

“Sense and Sensibility” is a profound achievement of romantic realism. Jane Austen demonstrates that to surrender oneself to romantic sensibility is the highway to ruin, but that the unity of logos and eros is beautiful and wholesome. Jane Austen, to my mind, was the preeminent romantic realist writer. Born into a modest clerical family, she [...]

Sir Roger Scruton: In Memoriam

By |2021-01-11T17:03:33-06:00December 28th, 2020|Categories: Paul Krause, Roger Scruton, Timeless Essays, Western Civilization|

Like moths attracted to the flame, students from all continents came together to study and discuss everything from music and aesthetics to politics and metaphysics with Sir Roger, who seemed to be the incarnate flame of wisdom. He was our Virgil through hell and purgatory, and he left us at the top of the mountain, [...]

Music for All Time: Reflections on Beethoven, on His 250th Birthday

By |2020-12-21T18:21:38-06:00December 15th, 2020|Categories: Beethoven 250, Ludwig van Beethoven, Mark Malvasi, Michael De Sapio, Music, Paul Krause, Stephen M. Klugewicz|Tags: , |

"This wasn't written for you!" Beethoven once stormed at string players who complained that one of his quartets was impossible to play. "It was meant for a later age!" And so all Beethoven's works are. They are, indeed, music for all time. Please enjoy this symposium on Ludwig van Beethoven, with contributions from our distinguished [...]

Hebraic Exceptionalism and Western Exceptionalism

By |2020-10-29T16:13:20-05:00November 7th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors, St. Augustine, Western Civilization|

The Hebrew Bible—in a sea of competitors—survived and bequeathed to the West many of our cherished principles and values. For this reason, the Bible is exceptional. To abandon the Hebrew Bible is not only to abandon the roots of our modern sensibilities and values, but ultimately to abandon the wellspring of the religion that nurtured [...]

Why “Gone With the Wind” Will Live Forever

By |2020-09-20T16:21:50-05:00September 18th, 2020|Categories: Literature, Paul Krause|

"Gone with the Wind" will endure because it is a true work of art, an unforgettable tale that transcends the pettiness of contemporary politics. Author Margaret Mitchell deals with the universal reality of the human condition, in the same way that Homer, Dante, and Tolstoy did. No work of art has recently come under such [...]

Augustine’s “City of God”: The First Culture War

By |2020-08-15T17:14:32-05:00August 15th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Civil Society, Culture War, Love, Paul Krause, Rome, Senior Contributors, St. Augustine|

In “The City of God,” Augustine systematically lays bare the empty ideology of the city of man and the Roman empire in a breathtaking counter-narrative that remains remarkably modern and relevant for today. In contrast to the city of man, the City of Love, Augustine argues, is the godly city to which Christians belong and [...]

Banishing the Party of Memory?

By |2020-07-02T15:43:06-05:00July 2nd, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Conservatism, Hope, Liberalism, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors, St. Augustine|

Banishing memory and the party of memory is nothing short of the banishment of the love and joy which make our lives and memories worth cherishing and conserving. The conservative celebrates the present order precisely because it is imbued with the traces of Eden which vivify our memories—and, therefore, our true selves—and unite us in [...]

The Swan Song of Roger Scruton: “Wagner’s Parsifal: The Music of Redemption”

By |2020-06-16T15:20:42-05:00June 16th, 2020|Categories: Books, Christianity, Culture, Music, Opera, Paul Krause, Richard Wagner, Roger Scruton, Senior Contributors|

In “Wagner’s Parsifal: The Music of Redemption,” Sir Roger Scruton guides us—like Virgil—through the twisty cosmos of Richard Wagner and leaves us at the gates of paradise. Those who desire a treatment of Wagner’s final opera without the pollution of ideological criticism will find a wonderful breath of fresh air in Scruton’s treatment of the [...]

“The Song of Roland”: The Triumph of Fealty, Truth, & Love

By |2020-06-03T08:41:12-05:00June 3rd, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Europe, Literature, Paul Krause, Poetry, Senior Contributors|

“The Song of Roland” communicates the values of fealty to lord and land that are combined with duty, heroism, and trustworthiness. The struggle that dominates the core of the poem, the battle between King Marsile and Roland, is not just a battle between Christianity and paganism—it is a battle for the soul of fealty and [...]

“Star Wars”: Identity, Love, and Redemption

By |2020-05-04T14:30:42-05:00May 4th, 2020|Categories: Film, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors|

Is Star Wars more than an entertaining space opera meant to relax us after the daily grind of post-industrialized life? To answer that question, we must consider the possibility of depth in cinema—that cinema is itself the vehicle for our post-technological mythology, manifesting our deepest fears as well as our subconscious and unconscious struggles. While [...]

The Sublime Beauty of Salvation

By |2020-04-09T12:04:16-05:00April 9th, 2020|Categories: Beauty, Christianity, Culture, Easter, Love, Paul Krause, Religion, Senior Contributors|

The victory of Christ on the Cross was not a victory of sunshine, happy thoughts, and rainbows. Nay, it was a victory of sublime splendor. It was horrifying. It was total. It was—and remains—through the eyes of faith, also beautiful. St. Paul says that he is determined to know, and preach, nothing but “Christ and [...]

The Culture of Conservatism

By |2020-03-02T10:36:37-06:00March 2nd, 2020|Categories: Civilization, Conservatism, Culture, Culture War, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors, Western Civilization|

Understanding who we are is an essential question to culture because the answer we give to that question affects how we understand our history, identity, and the symbolism—sacred and secular—that goes with it. Yet, there are many conservatives who have not the slightest inkling of this phenomenon. What is culture? “Culture War” has reentered the [...]

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