Paul Krause

About Paul Krause

Paul Krause is Senior Contributor at The Imaginative Conservative. He is a humanities teacher, classicist, and literary essayist. He contributed to the book The College Lecture Today, an Associate Editor at VoegelinView, and host of the podcast Literary Tales.

Why “Gone With the Wind” Will Live Forever

By |2020-09-20T16:21:50-05:00September 18th, 2020|Categories: Literature, Paul Krause|

"Gone with the Wind" will endure because it is a true work of art, an unforgettable tale that transcends the pettiness of contemporary politics. Author Margaret Mitchell deals with the universal reality of the human condition, in the same way that Homer, Dante, and Tolstoy did. No work of art has recently come under such [...]

Augustine’s “City of God”: The First Culture War

By |2020-08-15T17:14:32-05:00August 15th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Civil Society, Culture War, Love, Paul Krause, Rome, Senior Contributors, St. Augustine|

In “The City of God,” Augustine systematically lays bare the empty ideology of the city of man and the Roman empire in a breathtaking counter-narrative that remains remarkably modern and relevant for today. In contrast to the city of man, the City of Love, Augustine argues, is the godly city to which Christians belong [...]

Banishing the Party of Memory?

By |2020-07-02T15:43:06-05:00July 2nd, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Conservatism, Hope, Liberalism, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors, St. Augustine|

Banishing memory and the party of memory is nothing short of the banishment of the love and joy which make our lives and memories worth cherishing and conserving. The conservative celebrates the present order precisely because it is imbued with the traces of Eden which vivify our memories—and, therefore, our true selves—and unite us [...]

The Swan Song of Roger Scruton: “Wagner’s Parsifal: The Music of Redemption”

By |2020-06-16T15:20:42-05:00June 16th, 2020|Categories: Books, Christianity, Culture, Music, Opera, Paul Krause, Richard Wagner, Roger Scruton, Senior Contributors|

In “Wagner’s Parsifal: The Music of Redemption,” Sir Roger Scruton guides us—like Virgil—through the twisty cosmos of Richard Wagner and leaves us at the gates of paradise. Those who desire a treatment of Wagner’s final opera without the pollution of ideological criticism will find a wonderful breath of fresh air in Scruton’s treatment of [...]

“The Song of Roland”: The Triumph of Fealty, Truth, & Love

By |2020-06-03T08:41:12-05:00June 3rd, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Europe, Literature, Paul Krause, Poetry, Senior Contributors|

“The Song of Roland” communicates the values of fealty to lord and land that are combined with duty, heroism, and trustworthiness. The struggle that dominates the core of the poem, the battle between King Marsile and Roland, is not just a battle between Christianity and paganism—it is a battle for the soul of fealty [...]

“Star Wars”: Identity, Love, and Redemption

By |2020-05-04T14:30:42-05:00May 4th, 2020|Categories: Film, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors|

Is Star Wars more than an entertaining space opera meant to relax us after the daily grind of post-industrialized life? To answer that question, we must consider the possibility of depth in cinema—that cinema is itself the vehicle for our post-technological mythology, manifesting our deepest fears as well as our subconscious and unconscious struggles. While [...]

The Sublime Beauty of Salvation

By |2020-04-09T12:04:16-05:00April 9th, 2020|Categories: Beauty, Christianity, Culture, Easter, Love, Paul Krause, Religion, Senior Contributors|

The victory of Christ on the Cross was not a victory of sunshine, happy thoughts, and rainbows. Nay, it was a victory of sublime splendor. It was horrifying. It was total. It was—and remains—through the eyes of faith, also beautiful. St. Paul says that he is determined to know, and preach, nothing but “Christ [...]

The Culture of Conservatism

By |2020-03-02T10:36:37-06:00March 2nd, 2020|Categories: Civilization, Conservatism, Culture, Culture War, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors, Western Civilization|

Understanding who we are is an essential question to culture because the answer we give to that question affects how we understand our history, identity, and the symbolism—sacred and secular—that goes with it. Yet, there are many conservatives who have not the slightest inkling of this phenomenon. What is culture? “Culture War” has reentered [...]

Metamorphosis by Love

By |2020-02-13T19:41:21-06:00February 13th, 2020|Categories: Great Books, Imagination, Literature, Love, Myth, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors|

Ovid’s “Metamorphoses” is many things: several stories, some bleak, some uplifting, ranging from the creation of the world to the apotheosis of Julius Caesar. Yet in its most fundamental form, his epic love poem of many stories reveals deep truths in its poetic proclamations of the transformative power, and spirit, of love. Ovid was [...]

Shakespeare on Love and War

By |2020-02-05T13:52:16-06:00February 5th, 2020|Categories: Great Books, History, Imagination, Literature, Love, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors, William Shakespeare|

What hath Shakespeare to do with the politics of regime change? Given the long and unsuccessful history of what we call regime change, from the installment of the Shah over Persia, to the Bay of Pigs, to Libya, one questions the sanity of anyone who routinely calls for “regime change.” Yet long before our [...]

Milton’s Erotic Cosmos

By |2020-02-01T23:21:55-06:00February 1st, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Great Books, Imagination, John Milton, Literature, Paul Krause, Poetry, Senior Contributors, Theology, Uncategorized|

John Milton’s “Paradise Lost” is an intense poem, a passionate poem, an erotic poem. From the visual imagery to the very descriptive language Milton uses to portray his lively scenes to us, there is no escaping the reality of the life force that moves his poem. Why, however, did  Milton choose to write such [...]

The Drama of Love in Richard Wagner’s “Ring of the Nibelungen”

By |2020-01-23T22:40:05-06:00January 23rd, 2020|Categories: Love, Marriage, Music, Paul Krause, Richard Wagner|

Richard Wagner’s grand operatic drama The Ring of the Nibelung is rightly celebrated as one of the finest accomplishments of modern art. The story that Wagner tells, with the unfolding music meant to convey a primordial sense of enchantment forever lost to us, is about the tension between love and lust; the sacred and [...]

Heroes of Love

By |2020-01-15T15:10:03-06:00January 15th, 2020|Categories: Great Books, Greek Epic Poetry, Heroism, Homer, Iliad, Imagination, Literature, Love, Odyssey, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors|

One of the most defining aspects of our humanity is love. We are creatures of affectivity made in love for love. It is the recognition of this fact that makes Homer so eternal: his heroes are heroes of love. In a cosmos governed by lust, strife, and war, the loving deeds of our Homeric heroes stand [...]

Sir Roger Scruton: In Memoriam

By |2020-01-12T15:56:47-06:00January 12th, 2020|Categories: Paul Krause, Roger Scruton, Western Civilization|

Sir Roger Scruton, the prolific British philosopher and writer, died on January 12, 2020, after a six-month battle with cancer. A renowned intellectual whose interests and commentary covered political philosophy, aesthetics, and religion, Sir Roger was more than just a man who covered many topics with penetrating insight and erudition; he was, to me, a [...]

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