A New Standard, Timeless Truths

By |2019-01-25T15:47:30-05:00January 22nd, 2019|Categories: Civilization, Classical Education, Education, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning|

Some might wonder, is it a bad thing if liberal arts are on their way out? Are they worth reviving or even discussing? In November 2018, The University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point announced its plan to discontinue six liberal arts majors. The move garnered national attention and gave rise to a plethora of varying [...]

Where Is the Beauty in Buildings?

By |2019-01-11T16:18:22-05:00January 11th, 2019|Categories: Architecture, Beauty, Civilization, Culture, Modernity, Western Civilization|

A recent essay by Radomir Tylecote argued that we have turned our backs on the architectural traditions of our Western heritage, and in the process lost our connection to our own history and the generations that built it.[1] Dr. Tylecote argues well, and makes a strong case for reintroducing beauty into architecture; but his [...]

The Classics and Christianity

By |2019-01-11T15:44:57-05:00January 11th, 2019|Categories: C.S. Lewis, Christianity, Civilization, Classical Education, Classics, Culture, Great Books, Homer, Liberal Learning, Literature, Myth, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors, St. Augustine, Virgil, Western Civilization, Western Tradition, Worldview|

Christians invented the classical curriculum; it is as much part of the broader Western inheritance as it is specifically part of the Christian inheritance… Why study old books? How do dusty old books written by dead men and women thousands of years ago grow my faith? Such can be common thoughts when the Christian [...]

Franklin Pierce, Political Protest, & the Dilemmas of Democracy

By |2019-01-08T23:01:25-05:00January 8th, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Christianity, Civil Society, Civilization, Constitution, Democracy, Government, History, Ordered Liberty, Political Philosophy, Religion|

Franklin Pierce’s suspicions reflected a tension within the antebellum Democratic Party in relation to slavery—how can we reconcile an advocacy of democratic decision-making with the existence of transcendent moral values, the Constitution with the Bible? On the stump in New Boston, New Hampshire in early January 1852, Franklin Pierce gave a long oration during [...]

Storytelling and Modernity

By |2019-01-19T20:20:40-05:00January 2nd, 2019|Categories: Civil Society, Civilization, Community, Culture, George Stanciu, History, In Honor of Eva Brann at 90 Series, Modernity, Myth, Senior Contributors, Social Order|

The storytelling of a tribe gives each member a common remote past, communal heroes to emulate, shared social rules, and an answer to “Who am I?”  Editor’s Note: This essay is part of a series dedicated to Senior Contributor Dr. Eva Brann of St. John’s College, Annapolis, in this, the year of her 90th [...]

Versailles at 100

By |2018-12-31T12:59:10-05:00January 1st, 2019|Categories: Civilization, Democracy, Europe, History, Mark Malvasi, Nationalism, Senior Contributors, War, Western Civilization, Woodrow Wilson, World War I, World War II|

The Great War, in Woodrow Wilson’s view, had to become precisely what the delegates to the Congress of Vienna feared: a moral crusade, an instrument of social and political revolution… For American president Woodrow Wilson, the First World War was the “war to end all wars” by making “the world safe for democracy,” not [...]

The Uneasy Hiatus of the Infantile Era

By |2019-04-07T17:28:53-05:00December 27th, 2018|Categories: Christian Humanism, Civilization, Culture, Featured|

The condition of contemporary civilization appears to be a startling combination of the best and the worst: its unprecedented material prosperity and technological ingenuity coexist with what seems to be an equally unprecedented degree of cultural crudeness and spiritual vacuity. Since this is an uneasy and likely unsustainable coexistence, it is only reasonable to inquire [...]

On War: Homer’s Advice to Us

By |2018-12-27T13:54:39-05:00December 17th, 2018|Categories: Civilization, Homer, Imagination, Letters From Dante Series, Louis Markos, War|

Author's Introduction: Imagine if Homer, Virgil, Dante, Chaucer, and the other great poets of ancient Greece, Rome, and the Middle Ages had been given the gift, not only to peer into the twenty-first century, but to correspond with we who live in that most confusing and rudderless of centuries. Had it been in their power [...]

America’s Ship of Fools

By |2018-12-15T22:18:22-05:00December 15th, 2018|Categories: American Republic, Civil Society, Civilization, Faith, Government, Politics, Religion, Western Civilization|

Although somewhat overshadowed by the allegory of the Cave, the myth of the ring of Gyges, and other powerful images found in Plato’s Republic, the account of the ship of fools is still memorable and compelling. While Socrates—the Athenian philosopher and mentor of Plato—is discussing with his young friends the nature of justice and the [...]

A Backwards Civilization: Unthinking Leaders, Frenzied Citizens

By |2019-04-07T17:34:14-05:00November 27th, 2018|Categories: Civil Society, Civilization, Democracy, Featured, Meno, Modernity, Plato, Political Philosophy, Politics, Socrates|

In America today, we are living in a toxic political climate that is the product of a very dangerous combination: Our rulers lack the learning necessary to ask the kinds of deep and fundamental questions that leaders and lawgivers ought to make a habit of pondering, while our people rebelliously scrutinize all orthodoxies and [...]

Warfare in Epic Poetry

By |2018-11-27T07:26:12-05:00November 26th, 2018|Categories: Beauty, Civilization, Culture, Heroism, Homer, Iliad, Literature, Poetry, War|

A culture that fails to represent, or that misrepresents its wars in all their glory, gravity, and tragedy, is a weaker polity. Epic poetry, with its stark recording of the facts and feelings of war, can give cultures and communities access to the reality of warfare and inscribe its memory on the collective consciousness [...]

How Do We Restore the American Order?

By |2018-11-25T22:00:14-05:00November 25th, 2018|Categories: American Republic, Civilization, Culture War, Freedom, John Horvat, Ordered Liberty|

This is America’s tragic situation: The unifying framework of the American creed is now broken. The result is an America that is coming apart… On every American coin, there is the Latin expression, e pluribus unum, meaning “one out of many.” The motto is a celebration of the variety found in America expressed by [...]

Standing Athwart History: Can We Stop the Decline of the West?

By |2018-11-26T09:27:11-05:00November 11th, 2018|Categories: Art, Civilization, Culture, History, Michael De Sapio, Timeless Essays|

Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join Michael De Sapio as he considers the reasons for the decline of the West. —W. Winston Elliott III, Publisher That Western culture is in an advanced state of decay is, I would guess, an article of faith for many readers of The [...]

Four Sides of a Cube, Or, Why a Certain Question Needs to Be Asked Again and Again

By |2019-04-18T09:03:31-05:00October 24th, 2018|Categories: Civilization, Classical Education, Classical Liberalism, History, Liberal Learning, St. John's College|

We turn to the Great Books so that the encounter with them might do for us what they did for past generations. We turn to them as world makers, that they might aide us in understanding the world they were instrumental in bringing about, our world... “Today, is greatness still possible?’ ~Nietzsche[1] “Ideas do not [...]