Revolution

The Yachtsman and the Revolution

By |2019-09-13T09:56:44-06:00September 12th, 2019|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, History, Republicanism, Revolution|

James Henry Stark was a historian and defender of the Loyalists in an age of high reverence for the American Revolution. Stark’s unhappiness at the public presentation and textbook renderings of the Revolution seethed for years, until finally in 1910 he published “Loyalists of Massachusetts” to settle the debate. In March 1910, the wealthy [...]

The French and American Revolutions Revisited

By |2019-05-15T23:35:56-06:00May 15th, 2019|Categories: Books, History, Revolution|

Friedrich von Gentz It is often said that the American Revolution resonated across the pond and inspired the French to rebel and liberate their country in a similar, heroic fashion to that of their American allies. The nature of these two revolutions, however, ran divergent intellectual courses that made their causes, and [...]

Unearthed History: The War of The Vendée

By |2019-04-23T23:44:18-06:00April 23rd, 2019|Categories: Catholicism, Europe, History, Revolution|

The series of battles that took place in the Vendée have been almost entirely excluded from any recounting of the Revolution. Why? The rising in the Vendée paints a darker picture of the evils that Revolutionists did to those citizens, most of them peasants, who would not adopt the principles of the Revolution. Something about the [...]

Humanity Dehumanized: Hegel’s Reflections on the Enlightenment & the French Revolution

By |2019-01-20T22:27:17-06:00January 21st, 2019|Categories: Civil Society, Freedom, In Honor of Eva Brann at 90 Series, Philosophy, Politics, Revolution|

The Enlightenment, that is modern reason, failed us in part, Hegel shows, both for the history it left behind and the legacy it bequeathed us. Indeed it brought us and spirit to the point of self-destruction... Editor's Note: This essay is part of a series dedicated to Senior Contributor Dr. Eva Brann of St. John’s College, Annapolis, in [...]

Edmund Burke on Revolutionary Armies and Taxes

By |2019-08-27T16:41:54-06:00December 13th, 2018|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Civil Society, Conservation, Edmund Burke, Edmund Burke series by Bradley Birzer, Revolution, Taxes|

Though a classic in its own right, and arguably the first book on conservatism in the modern world, Edmund Burke’s Reflections on the Revolution in France of 1790 is inconsistent as a coherent work. And, yet, even in its unevenness, it reveals an act of genius. Burke himself points out that the greatest and truest things in [...]

Manifest Destiny and the American Nimrods

By |2019-07-30T16:35:31-06:00November 30th, 2018|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, Bradley J. Birzer, History, Nationalism, Politics, Revolution, Social Order, Tyranny|

Standing with his father as they watched the Battle of Bunker Hill in 1775, eight-year-old John Quincy Adams must have wondered in amazement at the bloody and brutal nobility of it all. And, what must he have thought as he traveled from one European seat of government to another as his father attempted to [...]

Edmund Burke on the Rage & Frenzy of the French Revolution

By |2019-03-05T14:31:47-06:00April 5th, 2018|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Conservatism, Edmund Burke, Europe, History, Leadership, Revolution|

As revolutionary as they claimed to be, the French Revolutionaries were as old as sin, Edmund Burke assured his readers. “Trace them through all their artifices, frauds, and violences,” he argued, and “you can find nothing at all that is new…” Roughly four-fifths into his spectacular Reflections on the Revolution in France, Edmund Burke [...]

Reflecting on Edmund Burke’s “Reflections”

By |2019-10-08T17:11:09-06:00March 13th, 2018|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Civil Society, Conservatism, Edmund Burke, Edmund Burke series by Bradley Birzer, Europe, Featured, History, Revolution, The Imaginative Conservative, Wisdom|

It would be difficult to find a more beautiful republican thought in all of Edmund Burke’s writings than this: “A man full of warm speculative benevolence may wish his society otherwise constituted than he finds it; but a good patriot, and a true politician, always considers how he shall make the most of the [...]

Edmund Burke & the French Revolutionaries

By |2019-07-09T13:30:01-06:00March 7th, 2018|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Conservatism, Edmund Burke, Edmund Burke series by Bradley Birzer, Featured, Revolution|

The French Revolutionaries, Edmund Burke rightly understood, sought not just the overturning of the old, but, critically, they also desired the destruction of the true, the good, and the beautiful. Only by lying about the nature of the human person could they accomplish their goals… One of the most important duties of any good [...]

The Siren Song of Anarchy in Western Art & Literature

By |2019-09-19T13:10:40-06:00January 15th, 2018|Categories: Art, Christian Humanism, Culture, History, Revolution, Timeless Essays|

The image of reason cut adrift and order overthrown are universal symbols of enormous and compelling power. Each of us sees in the dethronement of discipline and order an immediate personal advantage… Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join Stephen Tonsor as he explores the history of [...]

The Reformation Then and Now

By |2018-10-25T15:53:27-06:00October 31st, 2017|Categories: Catholicism, Christianity, Dwight Longenecker, Protestant Reformation, Revolution|

While the Reformation divided the Church, it must be said that it was brought on by her own inability and unwillingness to repent and turn to the Gospel. We can see some of the same trends today in our society and Church. For this Reformation Day, therefore, I would call for a new reformation in [...]

Should Conservatism Seek to Destroy the State?

By |2018-11-19T20:36:37-06:00October 16th, 2017|Categories: Beauty, Conservatism, History, Politics, Revolution, Russell Kirk, Truth|

For their own sake, as well as the sake of the civilization which they love, conservatives can and should deny the state’s legitimacy, on the grounds that it is destructive of the true, the good, and the beautiful… Two philosophies rarely seem as opposed as conservatism and anarchism. The Continental, Throne-and-Altar variant of conservatism [...]

At the Center of the Storm: John Sullivan of New Hampshire

By |2017-09-25T22:14:59-06:00September 25th, 2017|Categories: American Founding, M. E. Bradford, Military, Revolution, The Imaginative Conservative|

Controversy surrounds the story of John Sullivan’s life. Yet he is among the representative Americans of his time—gen­erous to a fault, jealous of his personal honor, optimistic, gregarious, ambitious, and “larger than life”… John Sullivan John Sullivan (1740-1795), lawyer, entrepreneur, soldier, and political leader of New Hampshire during and after the American [...]