Why We Need “Too Many” Firefighters

By |2019-03-19T15:58:39-05:00August 29th, 2018|Categories: American Republic, Civil Society, Community, Culture, Economics, Social Institutions|

Firefighters’ role in the perpetuation of the common good in American communities is significant, even in surprising and unexpected ways. At a time when America is suffering a decline in community service and volunteerism, we should be grateful for firefighters serving our communities in other ways… As wildfires rage across California, the state has once [...]

The Church and the Marketplace

By |2018-08-17T11:39:59-05:00August 18th, 2018|Categories: Catholicism, Economics, John Horvat|

I fear for the time when all vestiges of the Church are scrubbed from economy. Then there will be no more familial caregivers. The family will be reduced to a mere collection of selfish individuals. The moral law will be erased by the unbridled passions of frenetic markets… The adjective Catholic is rarely employed to [...]

Capitalism and the Gospel of Love

By |2018-08-15T11:44:18-05:00August 14th, 2018|Categories: Adam Smith, American Republic, Capitalism, Economics, Free Markets, Love, Modernity|

In The Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith was absolutely right: The widespread division of labor would cause the interior life to die; an unsurprising result, for under capitalism, the human person became a commodity, a resource, a thing used to further profits… My parents, Romanian gypsies, born in a Transylvanian village and raised in [...]

The Pursuit of the Good Life

By |2018-08-13T14:03:14-05:00August 13th, 2018|Categories: Books, Economics, Family, Joseph Pearce|

We went wrong when we replaced the pursuit of the Good Life with the pursuit of busy-ness, which, as “business,” is idolized as an end in itself; indeed, as the end in itself. We were not made to be busy; we were made to be good… Editor’s Note: Joseph Pearce responds to questions from [...]

Distributism vs. Free Market Globalism

By |2018-07-29T23:19:41-05:00July 29th, 2018|Categories: Capitalism, Distributism, Economics, Free Markets, Joseph Pearce|

The whole notion of a global problem requiring a global solution is rooted in a false logic. Effectively it is saying that because bigness causes problems we need even more bigness to solve them. Distributism as a derivative of the principle of subsidiarity offers the only real alternative to the cult of bigness in [...]

The Mouse That Roared & Defeated Walmart

By |2018-07-24T10:02:47-05:00July 23rd, 2018|Categories: Economics, John Horvat, Social Order|

Everyone is taught to believe that gigantic retailers are the most efficient distributors of goods to the general public. Small stores may be able to fill tiny niches. They may be quaint and picturesque. However, only the gigantic retailers have the capital and economy of scale to offer everyday lower prices and variety to [...]

Photographing the Lost World of Rural America

By |2019-02-12T17:57:35-05:00July 4th, 2018|Categories: American West, Civilization, Culture, Economics, Journalism|

Today America is on its third economic upswing, even as the places I visit have continued to fade away… For 23 years I have been driving country roads, photographing the ruins of rural America for a documentary I call “Lost Americana.” As population decline claims town after town, I have been talking to those [...]

President Trump and the American Piggy Bank

By |2018-06-13T12:37:11-05:00June 13th, 2018|Categories: American Republic, Donald Trump, Foreign Affairs, Pat Buchanan, Political Economy, Politics|

At the G-7 summit in Canada, President Donald Trump described America as “the piggy bank that everybody is robbing.” After he left Quebec, his director of Trade and Industrial Policy, Peter Navarro, added a few parting words for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau: “There’s a special place in hell for any foreign leader that engages [...]

Viktor Orbán, George Soros, & the Battle for Hungary

By |2018-06-13T00:07:00-05:00June 12th, 2018|Categories: Europe, Foreign Affairs, Government, Political Economy, Politics|

Many Hungarians clearly perceive their way of life and their country as under threat and sense that influential individuals like George Soros would like them fundamentally transformed. This is a fight between nationalists and anti-nationalists… The victory of Viktor Orbán and his party Fidesz in the Hungarian elections last month elicited the predictable flurry [...]

“The Wonderful Wizard of Oz” as a Fable of Modern America

By |2019-04-23T15:38:10-05:00June 4th, 2018|Categories: Books, Economics, Fiction, History, Mark Malvasi, Senior Contributors|

Literary scholars have long interpreted The Wonderful Wizard of Oz as a fable of populism, but it is more than that: It is a celebration of consumer culture as the the very meaning of America, this bright and shining land where men and women are happy to deceive themselves into believing a fairy tale, [...]

Cultural Debris: Two Conferences & the Future of Our Civilization

By |2019-04-04T12:47:00-05:00May 20th, 2018|Categories: Culture, Economics, Political Economy, RAK, Russell Kirk, Western Civilization|Tags: |

There still are men and women enough among us who know what makes life worth living—enough of them to keep out the modern barbarian, if they are resolute. If they are not resolute, and if they cannot make common cause, the garment of our civilization will go to the rag-bin, and the cultural debris [...]

Single-Issue Liberals

By |2019-02-07T12:56:20-05:00April 18th, 2018|Categories: Conservatism, Culture, Economics, Ideology, Liberalism, Politics|

Much has been written in recent years about the increasing polarization in American politics. Republicans have moved further to the right, while Democrats have moved further to the left. And seldom do they even attempt to meet anywhere in the middle. The phenomenon is undeniable. It’s observable on a daily basis and confirmed by [...]