Killing Socrates: The Death of a Great Books Program

By |2019-03-09T09:22:14-06:00March 8th, 2019|Categories: Classical Education, Classical Learning, Classics, Culture, Education, Great Books, Humanities, John Senior, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning, Wyoming Catholic College|

Few people know that in the early 1970s a “great books” program, founded by John Senior and two other professors, flourished at a large state university in the midwest. Even fewer know of its slow demise. Editor’s Note: Robert Carlson was a student and friend of John Senior, one of three founders of the [...]

Liberal Education: The Foundation and Preservation of a Free Society

By |2019-02-28T15:50:32-06:00February 27th, 2019|Categories: Classical Education, Freedom, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning, Liberty, Tradition, Western Tradition, Wisdom|

In a time of economic uncertainty, liberal education holds out the promise of joy in learning, contentment in contemplating truth, and satisfaction in community. These things are available to all people, rich or poor. Liberal education and the free society have always been intimately connected. A liberal education, an education which prepares one for [...]

Why “The Great Music” Is as Important as “The Great Books”

By |2019-02-11T08:53:32-06:00February 10th, 2019|Categories: Aristotle, Classical Education, Culture, Great Books, Liberal Learning, Music|

Ignorance of the great works of music is as bad, for someone who seeks to be educated in Western culture, as ignorance of Dante and Shakespeare in literature, and Plato and Aristotle in philosophy... Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join Peter Kwasniewski, as he considers the importance [...]

A New Standard, Timeless Truths

By |2019-01-25T15:47:30-06:00January 22nd, 2019|Categories: Civilization, Classical Education, Education, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning|

Some might wonder, is it a bad thing if liberal arts are on their way out? Are they worth reviving or even discussing? In November 2018, The University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point announced its plan to discontinue six liberal arts majors. The move garnered national attention and gave rise to a plethora of varying [...]

Ode to an Insightingale

By |2019-01-22T19:42:10-06:00January 21st, 2019|Categories: Classical Education, In Honor of Eva Brann at 90 Series, Liberal Learning, Peter Kalkavage, St. John's College|

No collection of great books, nor even the most wisely designed curriculum, which is but a recipe, can equal or even approach the importance of the faculty, whose members bring the program to life year after year. Eva Brann knows all this, and preaches it eloquently… Editor’s Note: This essay is part of a [...]

With Gratitude to a Sentinel of Classical Learning

By |2019-01-19T22:30:00-06:00January 19th, 2019|Categories: Classical Education, Classical Learning, Great Books, In Honor of Eva Brann at 90 Series, Liberal Learning, St. John's College, Wisdom|

From time to time, there is the need for sentinels of classical learning, individuals who, if one is fortunate to be around them, beckon the meandering intellect back to the pursuit of the truth, the discovery of the good, and the conservation of the beautiful. In the end, the student is invited to the quest [...]

The Classics and Christianity

By |2019-01-11T15:44:57-06:00January 11th, 2019|Categories: C.S. Lewis, Christianity, Civilization, Classical Education, Classics, Culture, Great Books, Homer, Liberal Learning, Literature, Myth, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors, St. Augustine, Virgil, Western Civilization, Western Tradition, Worldview|

Christians invented the classical curriculum; it is as much part of the broader Western inheritance as it is specifically part of the Christian inheritance… Why study old books? How do dusty old books written by dead men and women thousands of years ago grow my faith? Such can be common thoughts when the Christian [...]

An Education to Restore Wonder

By |2019-08-06T17:19:31-05:00December 29th, 2018|Categories: Classical Education, Classical Learning, Classics, Education, Great Books, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning, Wyoming Catholic College|

We’ve reached a time when fewer and fewer on the outside know what the liberal arts are, or the value of them to the individual person, an organization, and the marketplace of ideas. In an age when people are so focused on science and technology via “STEM” subjects, we’ve lost our sense of wonder… [...]

A Classical Educational Creed

By |2019-08-08T11:17:15-05:00December 28th, 2018|Categories: Classical Education, Classical Learning, Education, Liberal Arts|

Classical educators agree on the ends of liberal education, namely, the possession of the true, good, and beautiful, wisdom, and the development of the intellectual and imaginative powers that enable their attainment. But the pedagogical means to these ends are less obvious. Here is an attempt to set out a set of principles and [...]

Liberty and Liberal Education

By |2019-10-03T11:25:47-05:00December 25th, 2018|Categories: American Republic, Civil Society, Classical Education, Education, Great Books, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning, Western Tradition, Wyoming Catholic College|

Free citizens are necessarily invited to follow the Delphic injunction, “know thyself,” that is addressed to all mankind; and their success or failure in responding to this invitation is crucial for the preservation or loss of their liberty… Liberal education is the distinctive educational tradition of the West; so, too, is liberty our distinctive political tradition. [...]

Four Sides of a Cube, Or, Why a Certain Question Needs to Be Asked Again and Again

By |2019-04-18T09:03:31-05:00October 24th, 2018|Categories: Civilization, Classical Education, Classical Liberalism, History, Liberal Learning, St. John's College|

We turn to the Great Books so that the encounter with them might do for us what they did for past generations. We turn to them as world makers, that they might aide us in understanding the world they were instrumental in bringing about, our world... “Today, is greatness still possible?’ ~Nietzsche[1] “Ideas do not [...]

The Cave and the Consumer

By |2019-05-21T14:39:05-05:00October 6th, 2018|Categories: Classical Education, Education, Glenn Arbery, Liberal Learning, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

Whether the wisest should rule has always been a vexed question, largely because the wisest are least likely to seek (or be granted) the power and prominence that accompany the highest position. But even being educated—simply knowing more or seeing with greater depth—can lead to friction in a democratic society. The great 19th-century convert, Orestes [...]

Have We Misjudged Machiavelli?

By |2018-06-28T15:45:06-05:00June 28th, 2018|Categories: Books, Classical Education, Ethics, History, Politics|

Machiavelli can enter public debate not merely as a wicked man concerned only with power and political maneuvering, but as a philosopher with myriad insights to offer modern politics, politicians, and even apolitical members of the public… Be Like the Fox: Machiavelli In His World, by Erica Benner (384 pages, W. W. Norton & [...]

Ideology and the Humanities

By |2019-10-16T13:41:22-05:00June 8th, 2018|Categories: Classical Education, Education, Featured, Glenn Arbery, Humanities, Liberal Arts, Wyoming Catholic College|

Ideologies are mind-traps: They are constructed in such a way that they prejudge the motive of opposition to their systems. The great aim of liberal education is to liberate students from mere unexamined opinion into genuine thought… Some people use the word “ideology” neutrally, as though it meant any fairly comprehensive set of ideas. [...]