Heart and Mind

By |2021-06-11T15:50:42-05:00June 12th, 2021|Categories: Classical Education, Classical Learning, Glenn Arbery, Graduation, Humanities, Liberal Arts, Love, Wyoming Catholic College|

Paying attention to the guidance of the heart is no guarantee of prudent action, as Mark Antony and Cleopatra demonstrate with grand style, but there is something nobler in giving the heart its whole due than in bypassing its counsel and resorting to mere calculation. According to the 17th century mathematician and Catholic apologist Blaise [...]

Anna Julia Cooper: Uplifting the Oppressed With Liberal Arts Education

By |2021-06-10T16:14:10-05:00June 10th, 2021|Categories: Classical Education, Education, History, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning|

Anna Julia Cooper passionately defended classical education during the Reconstruction Era when the dilemma of how to educate former slaves arose. Cooper, a former slave herself, preached the virtue of classics and their necessary vitality to the soul. Anna Julia Cooper Why would a Black American female ex-slave revere the wisdom of dead [...]

Winged Words: Reading & Discussing Great Books

By |2021-06-01T09:36:29-05:00June 1st, 2021|Categories: Aristotle, Dante, Essential, Featured, Great Books, Homer, Humanities, Imagination, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning, Peter Kalkavage, Plato, St. John's College, Timeless Essays|

Great books introduce us to ideas and to ways of looking at the world that are new to us. They provide a refreshing distance from the trends, fashions, tastes, opinions, and political correctness of our current culture. Great books invite us to put aside for a while our way of looking at the world and [...]

The American College of the Building Arts

By |2021-06-11T09:02:07-05:00May 7th, 2021|Categories: Architecture, Beauty, Culture, Education, Labor/Work, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning, W. Winston Elliott III|

A. Wade Razzi, Chief Academic Officer at American College of the Building Arts, is interviewed by W. Winston Elliott III, Editor-in-Chief of The Imaginative Conservative. W. Winston Elliott III: Describe ACBA and its mission. The American College of the Building Arts was founded in the wake of Hurricane Hugo, which did massive damage to the [...]

The Case for the Liberal Arts: Stronger Than Ever?

By |2021-05-05T16:49:37-05:00May 5th, 2021|Categories: Classics, Education, Featured, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning, Plato, St. John's College, Timeless Essays, Wilfred McClay|

The chief public benefit of liberal education is the formation of a particular kind of person, a particular kind of citizen, who robustly embodies the virtues of both inquiry and membership, and therefore is equipped for the truth-seeking deliberation and responsible action that a republican form of government requires. If we are to make any [...]

Reviving the Liberal Arts in the Age of Cancel Culture

By |2021-03-03T16:25:40-06:00March 3rd, 2021|Categories: Education, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning|

The disappearance of a rigorous liberal arts curriculum has contributed to the decline of the free exchange of ideas on college and university campuses today. Renewing the study of the liberal arts is essential to resolving the free speech crisis and forming well-rounded citizens who are prepared to serve their communities, families, and country. Over [...]

Michael Oakeshott on the Tensions Between Political Theory and Practice

By |2020-08-19T13:42:20-05:00August 19th, 2020|Categories: Civilization, History, Liberal Arts, Michael Oakeshott, Political Philosophy, Politics|

Political theory sets out to consider the kind of knowledge involved in political activity and the appropriate form of education that will continue to inculcate this knowledge and the value in sustaining such knowledge to society. Political theory may not be so theoretical, after all. Within political theory, there is a pressure to operate in [...]

Why Academics Should Consider Classical Education

By |2020-08-12T15:22:45-05:00August 12th, 2020|Categories: Classical Education, Classical Learning, Education, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning, Modernity|

Academics who are interested in understanding the world in which we live, producing good citizens, and thinking beyond their own disciplinary cage should reconsider throwing all their eggs in the university basket and give serious attention to the possibility of taking up a post in an institution of classical learning. Prior to the pandemic, the [...]

Freedom, Responsibility, and the Liberal Arts

By |2020-06-11T12:46:33-05:00June 11th, 2020|Categories: Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning, Liberalism, Liberty, Politics, St. John's College|

Pericles was proud of Athenian freedom and insisted it was worth dying for. Our ancestors shared that pride and that insistence. But they and he were proud, not of the absence of discipline or authority, but of the fact that in a society of free citizens discipline and authority are self-imposed. The other day an [...]

A Unique Liberal Learning Opportunity

By |2021-04-24T22:58:52-05:00June 1st, 2020|Categories: Education, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning, St. John's College, W. Winston Elliott III|

Becoming educated is a process of becoming intellectually free so as to be capable of thinking for oneself, engaging in ongoing learning and inquiry, and achieving inner freedom. St. John’s College believes that the life of the mind is crucial to full human flourishing. Loyal readers of The Imaginative Conservative have been given many opportunities [...]

Why “Western Civ” Is Losing Its Appeal

By |2020-05-18T08:09:17-05:00May 17th, 2020|Categories: Books, Civilization, Classical Education, Culture, Education, Great Books, Liberal Arts, Literature, Modernity, Western Civilization, Western Tradition|

The Western canon as typically presented is increasingly unable to rally the enthusiasm even of devoted admirers of Western civilization, who recognize the commonly proffered canons as, at best, an impoverished rendition of Western culture and, at worst, a perpetuation of the very same cultural forces that are at the source of its decay. The [...]

Liberal Arts Pandemiology

By |2020-05-12T22:13:57-05:00May 13th, 2020|Categories: Coronavirus, Culture, David Deavel, Economics, Education, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning, Politics, Senior Contributors|

Those of us who bemoan the “death of the liberal arts” do not do so simply because the jobs of professors are at stake, but because we believe that liberal learning is the only fit preparation for any portion of life—especially one that involves responsibility for the common good. Those of us who have become [...]

The Joy of the Liberal Arts in a Pandemic World

By |2020-05-04T17:39:38-05:00May 4th, 2020|Categories: Culture, Education, Gleaves Whitney, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning|

In a crisis, it is best to balance change and continuity. The liberal arts help us do so by embracing both. On the one hand, they are the anchor-in-bedrock that conserves the best of our culture. On the other hand, they are the wind-in-the-sail that powers us to betterment. I. Accelerating Our Experience of Big [...]

Why Are the Classics Necessary?

By |2020-05-04T17:15:34-05:00May 4th, 2020|Categories: Classical Education, Classics, Liberal Arts, Literature, Timeless Essays|

Our need for the classics is intense. Yet any defense of them in our time must come from a sense of their absolute necessity—not from a desire to inculcate “cultural literacy,” or to keep alive a pastime for an elite, but to preserve the full range of hu­man sensibility. What is needed is to recap­ture [...]

Go to Top