The Dangers of Russophobia

By |2019-02-27T13:37:45-05:00February 24th, 2019|Categories: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Character, Communism, Government, Joseph Pearce, Political Philosophy, Politics, Russia, Senior Contributors|

We should not confuse or conflate Russian President Vladimir Putin with Soviet leaders, such as Josef Stalin. They are as different as the proverbial chalk and cheese. Nowhere is this more evident than the way in which Mr. Putin has shown himself to be a great admirer of the anti-Soviet dissident, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. The Special [...]

Pillars of Liberty: The Moral Virtues

By |2019-02-22T15:26:25-05:00February 21st, 2019|Categories: Audio/Video, Character, Civil Society, Education, Liberal Learning, Louis Markos, Virtue|

Dr. Louis Markos explains how the problem in today's education is not that virtue is forgotten, but that only certain "pseudo-virtues" are being taught. We're raising a generation of people who say, "Well, yeah, I do sleep around. But I recycle cans and so it's okay." We've thrown out the sins against morality and replaced [...]

Freedom’s Flaw in “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”

By |2019-02-09T14:24:15-05:00February 8th, 2019|Categories: Character, Culture, Freedom, Morality, Responsibility, Television, Tragedy, Virtue|

Mrs. Maisel must decide, like all other men and women who follow a path that separates them from their family, home, gods, and city, whether the allure of a life in the spotlight and the total freedom it promises is preferable to, or reconcilable with, the many good things she risks turning away from… [...]

Booker T. Washington’s Compromise

By |2019-02-07T12:05:07-05:00February 6th, 2019|Categories: Books, Character, Christine Norvell, History, Senior Contributors|

Booker T. Washington indeed might have sought reconciliation between white and black, but his call was truly to his own race alone to educate themselves and to work hard to improve mind and character. Does that make Washington a lesser advocate for racial equality, a less successful one? I first read Up from Slavery ten years [...]

Walter Camp and the Creation of American Football

By |2019-02-01T14:48:31-05:00February 1st, 2019|Categories: Books, Character, Culture, Football, History, Sports|

While the evolution of collegiate football was gradual, its rise in popularity was quite sudden—and it all began with Walter Camp, consummate Yale man and watch company executive. Minneapolis lawyer Roger Tamte has now given us the definitive Camp biography… Walter Camp and the Creation of American Football by Roger R. Tamte (408 pages, University [...]

Studies in Virtue: George Washington & George Marshall

By |2019-01-16T21:55:56-05:00January 16th, 2019|Categories: American Founding, Character, George Washington, Leadership|

What George Washington and George Marshall have to say to us has to do most of all with the ethical claims of the virtue of duty. Teachers would ably fulfill their calling if they convey to their students their conviction that civil society is best understood and entered into as a partnership in every virtue, [...]

T.S. Eliot’s Magical Journey

By |2019-01-05T23:09:22-05:00January 5th, 2019|Categories: Books, Character, Christianity, Dwight Longenecker, Literature, Poetry, Senior Contributors, T.S. Eliot|

Through T.S. Eliot’s use of symbolism in “The Journey of the Magi” there is a call to a world beyond words—just as the mystics of historic Christianity beckoned to Eliot from the beginning of his journey…  In the summer of 1927, just after his baptism into the (Anglo) Catholic faith, T.S. Eliot wrote “The [...]

Pull Down Thy Vanity

By |2019-06-17T17:12:51-05:00December 21st, 2018|Categories: Advent, Character, Christian Living, Christianity, Conservatism, Glenn Arbery, Senior Contributors, Virtue, Wyoming Catholic College|

There is something essentially comic about vanity. I ran into the phenomenon recently at the local fitness center where I have a membership. Everyone, I suspect, has seen the type: he lifts weights, often with a lot of noise, and he scorns machines like the treadmill or the elliptical trainer, much less — are [...]

Solzhenitsyn 1918-2018: A Centenary Celebration

By |2018-12-11T09:37:22-05:00December 11th, 2018|Categories: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Books, Character, Christianity, Heroism, History, Hope, Joseph Pearce, Senior Contributors|

The twentieth century produced many giants and many heroes. Yet many of the giants were not heroes, and many of the heroes were not giants. Hitler was a giant, as were Lenin, Stalin, and Mao. Each of these Nietzschean supermen was responsible for the deaths of millions of people. As for the heroes, one [...]

Reductio ad Machina: Human Identity in the Age of Machines

By |2018-12-14T00:58:50-05:00December 9th, 2018|Categories: Character, Charity, Community, Compassion, Conservatism, Culture, Imagination, Modernity|

"Technique has penetrated the deepest recesses of the human being. The machine tends not only to create a new human environment, but also to modify man's very essence…. He must adapt himself, as though the world were new, to a universe for which he was not created. He was made to go six kilometers an [...]

A Tiny Essay on Taking Offense

By |2019-02-25T14:32:35-05:00November 19th, 2018|Categories: Character, Civil Society, E.B., Eva Brann, In Honor of Eva Brann at 90 Series|

I love midnight movies, the Golden Oldies; they are the silver-lining of insomnia. Recently I caught part of an old black-and-white movie—Pressure Point—of the days when African-Americans were still called Negroes. Sidney Poitier plays a black prison psychiatrist. At one point his white patron says something about not expecting a Negro to be a successful [...]

“Othello” and the Devil Inside

By |2018-11-17T22:38:30-05:00November 17th, 2018|Categories: Books, Character, Ethics, Evil, Humanities, Liberal Arts, Literature, Tragedy, Virtue, William Shakespeare|

In Othello, William Shakespeare, the philosopher of everyday life, holds up a mirror to us and shows us what human beings are capable of. Beneath our most pleasantly cultivated exterior, there often lurks a serpent… William Hazlitt is widely recognized as one of the greatest of Shakespearean critics. Yes, there is Dr. Johnson; yes, [...]

Civility and Noblesse Oblige

By |2018-11-13T14:08:15-05:00November 12th, 2018|Categories: Character, Charity, Christian Living, Glenn Arbery, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

Noblesse oblige is more than merely being civil. In a Christian context, it treats those less talented or less fortunate without a show of superiority because it recognizes that they, too, are made in the image and likeness of God… What it means to be “civil” has undergone severe scrutiny lately. Hillary Clinton, for [...]