Bridging the North-South Divide: Jonathan Edwards and James Thornwell

By |2020-05-01T05:32:46-05:00May 2nd, 2020|Categories: American Republic, American Revolution, Christianity, Civil War, History, Religion, South, Theology|

The narrative of a North-South divide in American History is a powerful, yet problematic one. However, closer metaphysical inspection of both regions uncovers a series of considerable similarities and ironic connections between the Puritans of New England fully embodied in Jonathan Edwards, and the Presbyterians of the Old South fully embodied in James Thornwell. [...]

Who Put the West in Western Civilization?

By |2020-05-02T09:57:00-05:00May 2nd, 2020|Categories: Christendom, Christianity, History, Western Civilization|

No better champion of jus­tice, fairness, liberty, truth, and human flourishing exists than the complex and poorly known entity we call Western Civi­lization. The West’s weakening or demise would pose a threat to many human virtues. Recovering and extending Western principles remain our best hope for a more humane world. Where did “Western” Civilization [...]

Homage to Shakespeare

By |2020-05-14T17:08:10-05:00April 25th, 2020|Categories: Glenn Arbery, Imagination, Literature, Senior Contributors, William Shakespeare, Wyoming Catholic College|

The first spark of genuine engagement with great writers most often comes from a teacher, and the ever-fresh immortality of the great work has its ironic contrast in the aging and death of those who made the introduction. So it is for me with Shakespeare, who was first truly impressed upon my imagination during [...]

Tolkien: Entering Faerie

By |2020-04-24T15:23:57-05:00April 20th, 2020|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Fiction, Imagination, J.R.R. Tolkien, Literature, Myth, Senior Contributors|

What, exactly, is Faerie? While not quite the realm of the supernatural, it is the realm of grace (and its enemies), and it can be, even in its greatest beauty, dangerous in the extreme. It is also, by its very nature, sacramental, tangible, and incarnational. On March 8, 1939, just five months shy of [...]

The Paschal Sermon

By |2020-04-19T08:24:17-05:00April 19th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Easter|

The Catechetical Sermon of St. John Chrysostom is read during Matins of Pascha in the Orthodox Church and in the Eastern Catholic Churches of the Byzantine rite.  If any man be devout and love God, let him enjoy this fair and radiant triumphal feast. If any man be a wise servant, let him rejoicing enter into the joy [...]

Tolkien’s “The Lost Road”: Brilliant But Unfinished

By |2020-04-18T18:37:55-05:00April 18th, 2020|Categories: Books, Bradley J. Birzer, Fiction, Imagination, J.R.R. Tolkien, Literature, Senior Contributors|

An endearing story about fathers and sons—and almost certainly an autobiographical understanding of J.R.R. Tolkien himself and his own, mostly imagined father, as well as Tolkien and his son Christopher—”The Lost Road” begins with a son, Alboin, asking his father, Oswin, about the origin of his name. Though Tolkien had already written and published [...]

Online Learning, the Current Crisis, & Reading Alone

By |2020-04-17T17:55:31-05:00April 17th, 2020|Categories: Books, Culture, Education, Glenn Arbery, Liberal Learning, Senior Contributors, Writing, Wyoming Catholic College|

Our college, like most others, has adopted the new mode of “distance learning” during the current crisis. What if our students begin to learn a new kind of engagement with the written word precisely because of this momentary break from the habits of life at school and of absence from each other? I can’t [...]

American Heresies and Higher Education

By |2020-04-17T10:16:08-05:00April 17th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Culture, Liberal Learning, Peter A. Lawler, Timeless Essays|

Modern higher education tacitly accepts that any values pertaining to the intangible aspects of our experience, such as the humble appreciation of beauty or a passion for justice, are not real on account of being non-quantifiable; Socratic ignorance or wonder at life’s mysteries are lost, as are the moments of silence and grace during [...]