The Reality of the Resurrection

By |2021-04-03T17:34:25-05:00April 3rd, 2021|Categories: Catholicism, Christianity, Culture, Dwight Longenecker, Easter, Gospel Reflection, Philosophy, Timeless Essays|

Too often we Christians have given in to the temptation to sanitize the crucifixion and sentimentalize the resurrection. But the resurrection was not, at first, a cause for rejoicing, but the source of fear—soul-shaking, knee-knocking, heart-pounding, earth-quaking fear. One of the good things about Mel Gibson’s The Passion of the Christ is the gore. He [...]

The Harrowing of Hell

By |2021-04-02T15:08:20-05:00April 2nd, 2021|Categories: Catholicism, Christianity, Easter, Gospel Reflection, Hope, St. Thomas Aquinas|

Christ descended into hell to deliver His loved ones from their exile. He came to reward those who, from our first father, Adam, to His own foster-father, St. Joseph, had fought the good fight and had finished the race. The second reading from the Office of Readings for Holy Saturday is taken from an ancient homily on Christ’s [...]

Faith, Reason, and Eternal Happiness

By |2021-04-02T15:04:16-05:00April 2nd, 2021|Categories: Christianity, Faith, Michael De Sapio, Reason, Senior Contributors, St. Thomas Aquinas|

In “Theology: Mythos or Logos?” John Médaille accuses Thomas Aquinas of posing a quarrel between faith and reason, a separation that has had baleful consequences in Western culture. However, the problem that troubles Mr. Médaille appears not to be a problem if we examine the text of the “Summa” more closely. In a previous essay [...]

“Stations of the Cross”

By |2021-04-01T15:45:43-05:00April 1st, 2021|Categories: Christianity, Easter, Poetry|

Station I “Take up your cross and follow me,” you said. We couldn’t know then exactly what you meant, But then they placed the thorns upon your head, And mocked you for their mirthless merriment. Condemned you did not fight their condemnation, While they passed you back and forth like a child’s game. […]

John With Jesus: From Passover to the Garden of Gethsemane

By |2021-04-01T13:15:46-05:00April 1st, 2021|Categories: Barbara J. Elliott, Catholicism, Christianity, Easter, Gospel Reflection, Senior Contributors, Timeless Essays|

I went with Peter to make the arrangements for the Passover supper. When we arrived in Jerusalem, Jesus had told us to look for a man carrying a pitcher of water. We were to follow him into the house he entered, ask to speak to the owner, and say: “The master asks you where is [...]

The Ancient Liberty of Milton’s Epic Verse

By |2021-03-30T12:21:17-05:00March 30th, 2021|Categories: Christianity, Great Books, John Milton, Liberty, Poetry|

John Milton’s “ancient liberty” is not the liberalism of Thomas Hobbes or John Locke, where the telos governing human liberty is dispensed with. Rather, “Paradise Lost” cultivates Christian virtues by reclaiming an ancient liberty within the traditional epic verse form and by returning to that which is first or most ancient: Divine Will. The opening [...]

Can Politics Help Save Us?

By |2021-03-27T07:06:35-05:00March 27th, 2021|Categories: Christianity, Politics, Religion|

Politics, we are always to remind ourselves, is not God; to pretend otherwise is an affront to God. Nevertheless, politics may prove helpful in making it easier for us to get to God. Especially these days when it becomes more urgent than ever to remind the state of those things it may not do to [...]

Revisiting Mel Gibson’s “Passion of the Christ”

By |2021-03-24T16:44:11-05:00March 27th, 2021|Categories: Christianity, Culture, Film, Joseph Pearce, Senior Contributors|

It is inadequate to describe Mel Gibson’s masterpiece, “The Passion of the Christ,” as a film; it is much more than that. It would be more accurate to describe it as a moving icon. It calls us to prayer and leads us to the contemplation that takes us into the presence of Christ Himself. It’s [...]

A Mother’s Tale: Hilda van Stockum’s “The Winged Watchman”

By |2021-03-25T12:03:45-05:00March 26th, 2021|Categories: Books, Catholicism, David Deavel, Fiction, Senior Contributors, World War II|

The sharp focus on Mrs. Verhagen gives “The Winged Watchman,” Hilda van Stockum’s novel about a Dutch family during World War II, such power. The close-up tasks of the women are just as heroic as the tasks of the men who often fought to protect their loved ones. Who knew a great war story would [...]

Shakespeare’s Rome

By |2021-04-27T22:01:26-05:00March 26th, 2021|Categories: Glenn Arbery, Great Books, Rome, Senior Contributors, William Shakespeare, Wyoming Catholic College|

Rome does not occasionally become relevant in our understanding of political upheaval. Rather, it forms part of our very identity as Christians and heirs of the Western tradition that it helped shape. No one saw the essential drama of Rome more clearly than William Shakespeare. In the current issue of Atlantic magazine, editor-at-large Cullen Murphy [...]

Is It Morally Permissible to Receive the COVID Vaccines?

By |2021-03-24T10:26:36-05:00March 20th, 2021|Categories: Abortion, Catholicism, Christianity|

Any vaccine that has been derived or developed through or in conjunction with abortion is nothing that the Christian conscience can accept. And it would be a relief if Christians could hear a message of clarity and unwavering orthodoxy on this issue of issues from the leaders of the Church. A death-dealing industry and a [...]

The Life and Legacy of John Henry Newman

By |2021-03-20T15:46:01-05:00March 20th, 2021|Categories: Catholicism, Christianity, Joseph Pearce, Senior Contributors, Theology|

John Henry Newman was born in 1801, at the beginning of a century that would see the rise of skepticism in matters of religion. Yet, simultaneously, it was a century which would see a real revival of religious orthodoxy. With respect to the latter, Newman himself might be seen as the most important and influential [...]

Edmund Burke and the Progressive Mind

By |2021-03-19T15:14:54-05:00March 19th, 2021|Categories: Edmund Burke, Glenn Arbery, Great Books, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

Not swayed by popular enthusiasm, Edmund Burke was the first substantial thinker to address the full-blown entrance of radical ideas into the political sphere and the first to express a truly conservative umbrage at the imposition of abstractions onto a world of particular, distinctive circumstances. Juniors at Wyoming Catholic College have just read in Humanities [...]

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