Dostoevsky’s “Demons” Is a Novel for Our Times

By |2021-03-15T14:26:15-05:00March 15th, 2021|Categories: Fyodor Dostoevsky, Great Books, Ideology, Politics|

Dostoevsky’s “Demons” remains relevant more than a century after it was written as it invites readers to a melancholy symphony of self-reflection. The novel’s flailing revolutionaries are not caricatures of archaic belief systems but embody the very structure of human conflict. Dark, funny, and frenetic, Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Demons is a startlingly accurate portrayal of possession [...]

“The Madness of Crowds”: How Identity Politics Has Replaced Religion

By |2021-03-09T14:26:15-06:00March 11th, 2021|Categories: Books, Ideology, Liberalism, Politics, Sexuality|

Into the breach—or onto the deserted ground—has marched a new metaphysics in the form of a new religion. In “The Madness of Crowds,” Douglas Murray explains this “religion” of identity politics. The Madness of Crowds: Gender, Race and Identity, by Douglas Murray (304 pages, Bloomsbury Continuum, 2021) A better title for this book might have [...]

Fighting Totalitarianism With Beauty

By |2021-03-10T15:13:20-06:00March 10th, 2021|Categories: Beauty, Culture, Ideology, Politics|

If we are to withstand the coming totalitarian regime, we will need resources that are not just political but beautiful. We must become reattuned to our past and look to a standard outside ourselves. Reclaiming beauty means acknowledging that there are good things that have come before us. When the stock market becomes volatile, people [...]

After Trump’s Trial, What Next for Due Process Under the Democrats?

By |2021-03-09T15:57:39-06:00March 9th, 2021|Categories: Constitution, Presidency, Senior Contributors, Thomas R. Ascik|

According to the Constitution, due process, and everyday legal practice, Donald Trump did not receive a fair trial in the Senate. And beyond that: What did the impeachment trial look like? According to the Supreme Court, “Justice must satisfy the appearance of justice” (Offut v. United States). So, what’s next for the courts under Democratic [...]

The Strange Gospel of Masking and Public Policy

By |2021-03-09T15:54:46-06:00March 9th, 2021|Categories: Coronavirus, David Deavel, Politics, Science, Senior Contributors|

The lesson of the great masking crusade is important. We need to admit now that forcing unproven, divisive, and ultimately fruitless policies on the population has been a mistake. Universal mask mandates have not made a difference in fighting COVID. Rather, they have divided our country, provided a surplus of garbage, and caused some dental [...]

Sharing the President’s (Nuclear) War Powers?

By |2021-03-08T01:46:45-06:00March 7th, 2021|Categories: American Republic, Congress, Constitution, Joseph Biden, Politics, Presidency|

Suggestions that Congress use Article I Section VIII to restrict the president’s power to engage in war, nuclear or otherwise, are both unconstitutional and imprudent. Last week, 30 Congressional Democrats sent a letter to President Biden asking him to “review the ways in which you can end the sole authority you have to launch a [...]

Who Really Imperils the Republic?

By |2021-03-05T16:15:10-06:00March 5th, 2021|Categories: Pat Buchanan, Politics|

In the "domestic terrorism" at the Capitol, no protester set off a bomb, toppled a statue, or fired a weapon. Of the four who died that day, all were protesters. My guess, Minneapolis, not Capitol Hill, is where the action will be this spring, and it will not be Proud Boys keeping the cops busy, [...]

Bruce Springsteen and “Finding the Middle” in American Politics

By |2021-03-04T10:11:10-06:00March 3rd, 2021|Categories: Bruce Springsteen, Politics|

Bruce Springsteen sternly instructs us in his new infomercial to "find the middle" in politics. But the Founders made clear the fact that vigorous debate was critical to their vision of democracy. I can forgive Bruce for recycling footage and clothes from his Western Stars movie in that Super Bowl commercial (pulled by Jeep in [...]

Innocence Lost: Reading Nineteenth-Century American Literature

By |2021-03-02T00:45:37-06:00March 2nd, 2021|Categories: American Republic, Conservatism, Great Books, Herman Melville, Liberalism, Literature, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors|

In the wellspring of classic nineteenth-century American literature, a spectacular theme unites our greatest authors. They, in various ways, challenge the naïve optimism of the “American Adam” and American liberalism. They are deeply conservative in their skepticism toward human and civilizational progress and perfection. It is true that the classics, especially Virgil and Cicero, along [...]

Standing Athwart or Pulling the Plug at ‘National Review’?

By |2021-03-11T08:00:00-06:00February 28th, 2021|Categories: Conservatism, David Deavel, Politics, Senior Contributors|

‘National Review’ seems collectively incapable of seeing that it is no longer standing athwart history but is instead mostly athwart rank-and-file conservatives. NR is more liberal echo than conservative choice these days, and I don’t see any sign of recovery. William F. Buckley “Every young writer, I imagine,” wrote Ross Douthat, “has their [...]

Robert Nisbet’s “The Social Group in French Thought”

By |2021-02-24T19:24:01-06:00February 24th, 2021|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Civilization, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Political Philosophy, Politics, Robert Nisbet, Senior Contributors|

In “The Social Group in French Thought,” Robert Nisbet explains that social philosophers such as Bodin, Hobbes, and Rousseau undermined and sabotaged private law and intermediary institutions. Their thought culminated in the French Revolution and in its radical and nationalist legislation. Robert Nisbet’s dissertation began by lamenting that the history of freedom has been written [...]

Parties and Presidential Selection

By |2021-02-23T10:52:46-06:00February 22nd, 2021|Categories: American Republic, Electoral College, Politics, Presidency|

The current presidential selection system is broken. The way to fix it is by returning to strong parties at the national, state, and local levels. The 2004 Senate election and 2008 Presidential election of Barack Obama demonstrate how outside actors can create political momentum to capture a political party. This results in a party that [...]

A Quiet Killing

By |2021-02-19T20:06:39-06:00February 19th, 2021|Categories: American Republic, Donald Trump, Justice|

For the first time in a very long time, no one is second-guessing the decision by a police officer to use deadly force against an unarmed woman. Why? The storming of the Capitol was criminal and a disgrace. Assaults upon our democratic institutions, whether from the Right or the Left, should never be tolerated. At [...]

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