Politics

The Myth of “Coequal” Branches of the Federal Government

By |2019-10-22T22:17:54-06:00October 22nd, 2019|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, Books, Government, History|

The popular myth, retold almost daily by members of Congress, that the Constitution established three separate, but equal branches, of government has no basis in fact. The true intent of the Framers was for the Congress to be supreme because it is the nature of representative government that the most representative branch should be most [...]

Seeing the West as a Millstone: Sketches of Solzhenitsyn in Exile

By |2019-10-16T22:43:39-06:00October 16th, 2019|Categories: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Conservatism, Democracy, Joseph Pearce, Literature, Political Philosophy, Politics, Senior Contributors, Western Civilization|

“Sketches of Exile” is a real gift for those who admire Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, enabling us to see his first years of exile, in Switzerland and the United States, through his eyes. We should be grateful for these sketches and the insight they offer, as well as for their glimpses of the lovable man behind the [...]

“Prince Caspian” and Political Extremism

By |2019-10-15T12:21:48-06:00October 15th, 2019|Categories: Books, C.S. Lewis, Conservatism, Literature, Politics, Populism|

Those who object to globalism find themselves in a frustrating, even infuriating position, even now in the age of Brexit and Donald Trump. Three years after the 2016 votes were counted there is still no wall, Britain is still stuck in the EU, and an anonymous White House “adult in the room” has gotten [...]

How America Went to War Against Itself

By |2019-10-15T10:06:04-06:00October 13th, 2019|Categories: American Republic, George Stanciu, Government, Politics, Senior Contributors, War|

That Americans cannot reach consensus on gun control, immigration policy, and climate change are symptoms of societal collapse, not from physical causes, such as the mindless destruction of a vital resource or a colder climate, but rather the splitting of a people’s storytelling into two opposed morality plays. The stable standoff between these two stories [...]

The Death of Eros & the Tragedy of Love in “Antony and Cleopatra”

By |2019-10-11T12:59:16-06:00October 10th, 2019|Categories: Imagination, Literature, Love, Paul Krause, Politics, Senior Contributors, William Shakespeare|

Antony and Cleopatra is one of the most mature of William Shakespeare’s tragedies. As such, it is arguably one of his finest and deepest works. Pride, love, and the Fall all factor into the play as much as does the contest between temporal politics and eternal love. Antony and Cleopatra are passionate and energetic [...]

Brexit or Leave It

By |2019-10-09T06:43:29-06:00October 8th, 2019|Categories: Conservatism, England, Europe, Government, Joseph Pearce, Politics, Senior Contributors|

What does the European Union have in common with Hotel California? The answer is that you can check out any time you like, but you can never leave. Take, for instance, the ongoing Brexit saga. Over and again, in one democratic vote after another, the British people have made it abundantly clear that they [...]

Matthew Peterson’s Not-So-Modest Proposal on Student Debt

By |2019-10-07T23:25:08-06:00October 6th, 2019|Categories: David Deavel, Economics, Education, Politics, Senior Contributors|

Everybody agrees student loan debt is a large problem. In the United States approximately $1.5 trillion is currently owed by around 45 million people at an average of over $32,000 per borrower. While relatively few borrowers owe more than $75,000, that relatively few includes over 4 million people. Another 24 million borrowers owe more [...]

China is Fighting for Its Life—and Its Soul

By |2019-09-26T14:05:16-06:00September 28th, 2019|Categories: Christianity, Civilization, Communism, Democracy, Foreign Affairs, Politics|

Today, China has entered a period of general crisis. It was brought about not merely by slow economic growth and its attendant problems, but by a total upheaval touching every aspect of life in the Middle Kingdom: economic and political, intellectual and religious. Mark this date on your calendar: November 19, 2023. This date would [...]

“My Beloved Country”: Remarks to the United Nations General Assembly

By |2019-09-25T14:25:14-06:00September 25th, 2019|Categories: Donald Trump, Foreign Affairs, Government, Immigration|

Editor's Note: President Trump delivered the following remarks to the 74th Session of the United Nations General Assembly on September 24, 2019. Thank you very much. Mr. President, Mr. Secretary-General, distinguished delegates, ambassadors, and world leaders: Seven decades of history have passed through this hall, in all of their richness and drama. Where I stand, [...]

Blessed Fr. Jerzy Popiełuszko: Martyred Freedom Fighter

By |2019-09-21T10:38:07-06:00September 21st, 2019|Categories: Character, Christianity, Communism, Culture, History|

Fr. Jerzy Popiełuszko preached faith and freedom to the people of Poland. The communists hated him, and someone ordered his murder. But we have this enduring commandment from Fr. Jerzy: “Defeat evil with goodness!” It remains valid even as communism has morphed into post-communism in the former Soviet zone, and reemerged as radical secular [...]

Conservatism and Our Constitutional Inheritance

By |2019-09-08T23:16:39-06:00September 8th, 2019|Categories: Congress, Conservatism, Donald Trump, Populism, Presidency, Timeless Essays|

The constitutional inheritance is not merely a gift to be expended or consumed; it is a responsibility to be stewarded. This sense of intergenerational obligation—debts to the past and future—is the most solid and powerful grounding for originalism and respect for constitutional form. Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the [...]

When Mother Teresa Came to Washington

By |2019-09-06T10:21:50-06:00September 5th, 2019|Categories: Barbara J. Elliott, Catholicism, Culture, Politics, Ronald Reagan, Sainthood, Senior Contributors, Virtue|

As I looked around that room in Washington, filled with so many powerful people, I realized that one day in Mother Teresa’s life brought more good to the face of the earth than all our efforts combined for a lifetime. Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join Barbara [...]