On the Purpose of Commentary

By |2020-03-16T00:27:14-05:00March 16th, 2020|Categories: Culture, Modernity, Politics|

We live in an era replete with articles, podcasts, and opinion pieces. Public and private conversation often center on the latest unbelievable event. Wherever we find ourselves, we are surrounded by opinions and commentary. In such a sea of commentary, one wonders what the purpose of it all is. […]

The Divine Discontent of the Atheist Heart

By |2020-03-14T16:21:51-05:00March 14th, 2020|Categories: Atheism, Christianity, Culture, David Deavel, Religion, Senior Contributors|

Like all human beings, the atheist ones I’ve seen and known are always prattling on about justice and injustice. But atheists don’t seem to realize that there is such a category as “should” because there is a design for the world that we perceive. Atheists do not believe in God, but I confess that [...]

The Music of Harold Shapero: Tradition and Innovation

By |2020-03-12T15:56:41-05:00March 13th, 2020|Categories: Audio/Video, Culture, Michael De Sapio, Modernity, Music, Senior Contributors|

We owe it to ourselves to get to know Harold Shapero, who showed that strikingly inventive things still could be done with the perennial tools of tonal music. His works crackle with intelligence and sing with rare melodic beauty. They are both timeless and of their time. For despite its classic foundations, Shapero’s music [...]

1939’s “Stagecoach”: The Reign of Justice and Redemption

By |2020-03-13T17:39:48-05:00March 13th, 2020|Categories: American West, Bradley J. Birzer, Culture, Film, Morality, Senior Contributors|

In 1939, John Ford released Stagecoach, a learned and perceptive cinematic work of art that not only introduced John Wayne as a major player in Hollywood but one that also made the western something more than a mere backdrop for pulp-ish adventure stories. Indeed, the movie shows that the western can serve as the [...]

Songs & Dances of Death: 10 Classical Works for the End of Time

By |2020-03-13T00:53:45-05:00March 12th, 2020|Categories: Audio/Video, Camille Saint-Saëns, Gustav Mahler, Jean Sibelius, Music, Richard Strauss, Stephen M. Klugewicz, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart|

From Modest Mussorgsky's Songs and Dances of Death to Oliver Messiaen's Quartet for the End of Time, here are ten great classical pieces about death and the end of this world. They may or may not provide you comfort. 1. Songs and Dances of Death, by Modest Mussorgsky A song cycle for voice (usually bass [...]

Byzantium’s Orphans, Rome’s Foundlings: The Legacy of the Greek Unionists

By |2020-03-11T13:28:22-05:00March 11th, 2020|Categories: Christendom, Christianity, Culture, History, Religion, Theology, Western Civilization|

The admonitions of Byzantine’s unionists resonate well beyond the Fall of Constantinople—if we had but ears to hear them. Indeed, we today, standing amidst the threatened walls of the house of the West that was once known as Christendom must cherish a culture of Christian solidarity, the conviction that the City of God is [...]

Art and Patriotism in Japanese-American Internment Camps

By |2020-03-11T03:08:59-05:00March 10th, 2020|Categories: Art, Culture, History, World War II|

During the Japanese-American internment of 1942-1946, there arose a style of art that drew from elements and techniques of Western and traditional Japanese forms. Through a closer look at these works of art, Japanese-American internment art can serve to reflect the internees’ cultural, social, and political resilience while also allowing us to study the [...]

“All Hail to Ulysses”

By |2020-03-09T14:56:36-05:00March 9th, 2020|Categories: Audio/Video, Civil War, Music|

This song was written in 1864 in honor of General Ulysses S. Grant, who was appointed commander of all the Union armies in March of that year. Words by Charles Haynes and music by J.E. Haynes. Published by Root and Cady of Chicago. —Editor Lyrics All hail to Ulysses, the patriot’s friend, The hero of [...]

The Deep Power of Joy

By |2020-03-07T11:03:54-06:00March 7th, 2020|Categories: Culture, Education, George Stanciu, Nature, Poetry, Senior Contributors, Wyoming Catholic College|

Wordsworth’s introspection in “Tintern Abbey” leads him to attempt to answer the question we ask with our curriculum at our college: How does the experience of unforgettable natural beauty in the full vitality of youth affect the moral and spiritual life that follows? As all the world should know, the curriculum at Wyoming Catholic [...]

For Thine is the Kingdom: Tom Holland’s “Dominion”

By |2020-03-07T16:53:58-06:00March 7th, 2020|Categories: Books, Christendom, Christianity, Civilization, Culture, Dwight Longenecker, History, Religion, Senior Contributors, Western Civilization|

Like a queen who rides a bicycle, Tom Holland’s “Dominion” is both majestic and down-to-earth. From antiquity to modernity, Mr. Holland traces a sneaky thesis that Christianity has changed the world—transforming it from the inside out. Dominion: How the Christian Revolution Remade the World, by Tom Holland (624 pages, Basic Books, 2019) Every once [...]

Higher Education’s Contemporary Identity Crisis

By |2020-03-04T17:01:04-06:00March 6th, 2020|Categories: Classical Education, Culture, Education, Liberal Learning|

Many factors have conspired to fuel the crises roiling higher education today. Perhaps the most important, and the reason so few institutions react appropriately when they arise, is that colleges and universities are facing a crisis of purpose and identity. Another day, another campus crisis.[1] And yet the truly urgent problems in higher education—students [...]

Beethoven: The Price of Genius

By |2020-03-06T12:13:52-06:00March 6th, 2020|Categories: Beethoven 250, Ludwig van Beethoven, Mark Malvasi, Music, Senior Contributors|

Beethoven’s eccentricities only enhanced his reputation. They confirmed the divine madness that propelled his creative genius. He was a martyr to his art, a new kind of saint whose agonies and ecstasies brought him neither peace of mind nor purity of soul, but an admixture of public renown and disrepute. Sculpture by Max Klinger [...]