If Shakespeare Was a Woman, Might Jane Austen Have Been a Man?

By |2019-06-01T22:41:22-05:00June 1st, 2019|Categories: Books, Culture, Jane Austen, Joseph Pearce, Literature, Senior Contributors, Shakespearian Authorship, William Shakespeare|

We live in a mad, mad world where anything goes and many things have gone. One of the things that appears to have gone is a sense of sanity. Take, for instance, a recent essay in The Atlantic which claims to show that William Shakespeare was in fact a woman.[*] The essay itself, which was [...]

In the Ruins of Babylon: The Poetic “Genius” of John Keats

By |2019-05-29T23:11:39-05:00May 29th, 2019|Categories: Christianity, Culture, Love, Paul Krause, Poetry, Religion, Senior Contributors|

The poetry of John Keats is a window into the mad genius of the Romantics: their lusts and hopes; their ambitions and ignorance; their radicalism and fantasies. In reading Keats, one is simultaneously scandalized and sympathetic to the longing of the Romantic heart. “The best things we have come from madness.” John Keats died [...]

The Art of Tintoretto: Realism and Religion

By |2019-05-24T10:36:42-05:00May 24th, 2019|Categories: Art, Culture, Michael De Sapio, Senior Contributors|

Unlike modernists of more recent vintage, Venetian Renaissance master Tintoretto aimed at higher ideals than the projection of his ego. He ordered his talents to honoring the Classical and Christian civilization of which he was a part. Yet, where High Renaissance artists strove for classical serenity and poise, Tintoretto stupefied his contemporaries with grand displays of [...]

“Poems Unwritten”

By |2019-05-21T12:57:25-05:00May 21st, 2019|Categories: Culture, Imagination, Poetry|

Sometimes, when the light and the mists of the day Settle holy and soft on the edge of the night, When the sights and the sounds of the world melt away, And the vision that lives in the soul takes flight, That feeling comes on I felt since I was young, Of poems unwritten and [...]

Killing Kate Smith

By |2019-05-24T11:06:36-05:00May 19th, 2019|Categories: Culture, Modernity, Music|

Kate Smith’s version of “God Bless America” moved the hearts of listeners worldwide. Yet, she is now being “investigated” for potentially racist lyrics, as if she committed a crime worthy of being prosecuted at the Nuremberg Trials. Let us hope that we can make a stand to defend those who represent beauty, truth, and [...]

Orestes Brownson’s New England and the Unwritten Constitution

By |2019-05-20T10:01:09-05:00May 19th, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Civil Society, Constitution, Culture, History, Political Philosophy, Politics, Timeless Essays|

Orestes Brownson so esteemed New England people, customs, and institutions that they dominated his writings and fit at the heart of his political ideas. Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join Michael J. Connolly, as he considers the political thought of Orestes Brownson. —W. Winston Elliott, Publisher [...]

How I Was Wrong About the Movie “Tolkien”

By |2019-05-18T22:09:39-05:00May 18th, 2019|Categories: Culture, Film, J.R.R. Tolkien, Joseph Pearce, Literature|

There is no doubt that “Tolkien” is a good film with an adroitly crafted storyline, bereft, thankfully, of the poisonous wormtongued agenda that I feared it would have. I have a confession to make. Indeed, I need to make an apology. A few weeks ago, I wrote an essay entitled “Wormtongue’s Revenge”, in which [...]

A Day of Reckoning: Glenn Arbery’s “Bearings and Distances”

By |2019-05-16T22:06:48-05:00May 16th, 2019|Categories: Books, Culture, Fiction, Glenn Arbery, Imagination, Literature, South|

Glenn Arbery’s “Bearings and Distances” shuttles back and forth between two eras, weaving, careening, towards an inexorable revelation of truth. The plot is rich and complex, and its world is both fertile and elusive in meaning, expanding through time and culture, expressing a deeply Catholic view of the cosmos. Bearings and Distances, by Glenn [...]

500 Pastas: Why America Lacks a National Cuisine

By |2019-05-13T13:31:08-05:00May 13th, 2019|Categories: Culture, John Horvat, Tradition, Western Civilization|

Some American places have excellent local cuisines. However, the cultures that sustain them are dying, as they are in Italy with its pasta cuisine. We are losing our connection with the roots of cuisine because our culture is shattered, fragmented, and undermined by globalization. Paging through the food section of The Wall Street Journal, [...]

Measuring the Influence of Russell Kirk and Other Conservative Authors

By |2019-05-17T10:22:05-05:00May 12th, 2019|Categories: Christopher Dawson, Conservatism, Culture, Eric Voegelin, Irving Babbitt, Robert Nisbet, Russell Kirk|

By using Google’s Ngram Viewer, we find that Russell Kirk’s reputation hit its highpoint in 1964, and then began a painful decline that remained unabated until his death in 1994. What does Ngram tell us about other conservative authors, like Robert Nisbet, Leo Strauss, Eric Voegelin, and Christopher Dawson? While I would never consider [...]