C.S. Lewis in the Deep South

By |2019-04-13T16:06:57-05:00April 13th, 2019|

With a dream, hard work, and real sacrifice, the good Christian people at Bob Jones University have created something beautiful and real. By creating Narnia onstage, they are captivating the imaginations of a new generation of children and sneaking them past the ever-watchful and increasingly dangerous dragons of secular materialism. When I left Bob [...]

The Faith and the South

By |2019-02-08T21:42:23-05:00February 8th, 2019|

When we think of “the faith and the South” we tend to think of Protestantism in general, and perhaps the Southern Baptists in particular, especially in terms of the so-called Bible Belt. There is, however, much more to the South than the Protestant evangelical or fundamentalist culture that has made its presence felt, socially [...]

Lord Acton and the American Civil War

By |2019-02-07T12:32:08-05:00February 7th, 2019|

Lord Acton believed that the wrong side won the American Civil War. Such a judgment could hardly be said to be a minor detail of someone’s historical worldview, yet this judgment has somehow been obscured… “Power tends to corrupt; absolute power corrupts absolutely.” Among Catholic students of political thought, few figures are more liable [...]

Wendell Berry’s “What Are People For?”

By |2018-08-30T21:13:19-05:00August 30th, 2018|

As one reads What Are People For?, an important underlying and unifying theme—the struggle to avoid abstraction—emerges, a theme which reveals perhaps Wendell Berry’s greatest concern about modern life... What Are People For? by Wendell Berry (224 pages, North Point Press, 1990) “We should love life,” Dostoyevski once said, “more than the idea of life.” It is [...]

Saving Architectural Treasures of the Old South

By |2019-03-05T14:31:27-05:00July 27th, 2018|

The South’s combination of architectural preservation with genealogy and with the documentation of human toil has often resulted in a much richer testament of the past and a more balanced view of the region’s history… In the film version of Margaret Mitchell’s Gone With the Wind, after Atlanta has been burned and Scarlett O’Hara is [...]

M.E. Bradford: The Agrarian Aquinas

By |2018-07-04T13:30:07-05:00July 3rd, 2018|

M.E. Bradford did not write a lot about the agrarian life per se. His interest was in defending the South in which the agrarian way was taken for granted… M.E. Bradford I have called M.E. Bradford the Agrarian Aquinas. He did not write a Summa, but his work as a whole enriched and [...]

The Attack on Memory

By |2018-06-21T22:06:42-05:00June 21st, 2018|

History is the “remembered past,” remembered according to values and virtues that are the inheritance of a particular people. The story as told gives meaning to the “facts,” and the story must be told to be remembered… “Remember therefore from whence thou art fallen, and repent, and do the first works; or else I [...]

Donald Davidson Revisited

By |2018-05-24T12:23:11-05:00May 24th, 2018|

Though he passed away in 1968, Donald Davidson’s efforts and criticisms continue to deserve much attention, since the South has become more decadent in its disregard for the past since his death… Mel Bradford has argued that no individual has exerted more influence upon the development of a profession of letters this century in [...]

In Search of the Real Abraham Lincoln

By |2018-05-17T23:42:30-05:00May 17th, 2018|

For many, Abraham Lincoln became a symbolic Christ, for some, perhaps, more than symbolic. They could scarcely help themselves, the parallels were so striking. He was the savior of the Union, God’s chosen instrument for bringing the millennium to suffering humanity, born in a log cabin (close enough to a stable), son of a [...]

How Neoconservatives Destroyed Southern Conservatism

By |2019-02-14T13:15:31-05:00May 10th, 2018|

Neither the leftist Marxist multiculturalists nor the Neoconservatives reflect the genuine beliefs or inheritance left to us by those who came to these shores centuries ago. Both reject the historic conservatism of the South, which embodied that inheritance and the vision of the Founders… No discussion of Southern conservatism, its history and its relationship [...]

M.E. Bradford’s Revolutionary “A Better Guide Than Reason”

By |2019-04-18T12:22:19-05:00April 30th, 2018|

No one who reads and digests A Better Guide Than Reason can fail to be revolutionized. We had thought that the great Southern political tradition—that of Patrick Henry, Thomas Jefferson, John C. Calhoun, and the agrarians—was dead. Not so… A Better Guide Than Reason: Studies in the American Revolution by M.E. Bradford (241 pages, Sherwood Sugden & [...]

The Lasting South? A Reconsideration

By |2018-04-25T22:48:35-05:00April 25th, 2018|Tags: |

Ambiguities and contradictions aside, the Southern conservative tradition, by a heroic act of mind, may yet be summoned against the distortions of modernity, and, in particular, against the alluring gnostic supposition, now so prevalent, that men can alter the nature of existence and transmute the substance of being… From the perspective of the twenty-first [...]

Reconsidering William Jennings Bryan

By |2018-04-19T10:23:14-05:00April 19th, 2018|

William Jennings Bryan was admired because of his willingness to stand up for the common man. Most importantly, Bryan believed in the Jeffersonian system of government and wanted to limit the power of the elite… When William Jennings Bryan died in 1925, H.L. Mencken wrote a scathing eulogy stating: There was something peculiarly fitting [...]

Thomas Jefferson and the Paradox of Slavery

By |2018-04-19T20:32:27-05:00April 17th, 2018|

The masters of slaves, it turned out, were themselves neither independent nor self-sufficient, but were bound to, and reliant upon, their slaves both for their welfare and their identity. This vague recognition in part accounts for the grim tone that Thomas Jefferson adopted in his analysis of slavery: He had to confront the prospect [...]