Lessons From the American South for Healing Our Nation

By |2020-12-18T09:43:43-06:00December 17th, 2020|Categories: Civil War, South|

After the War Between the States, there was a conscious effort at reconciliation on the part of many in both North and South. This postbellum reconciliation has mostly unraveled, in no small part thanks to conservative establishmentarians who for years have refused to raise a peep—or, in many cases, collaborated—during the leftist campaign against Southern [...]

Ideas Still Have Consequences: Richard Weaver on Nominalism & Relativism

By |2020-12-04T13:00:57-06:00December 6th, 2020|Categories: Philosophy, Relativism, Richard M. Weaver, Southern Agrarians|

Richard Weaver’s book “Ideas Have Consequences” presents the harmful effects of nominalism on Western civilization since it gained prominence in the Late Middle Ages. Many of our modern woes stem from the acceptance of nominalism and the rejection of philosophical realism back in the fourteenth century. By the time of his untimely death in [...]

The Southern (Catholic) Tradition

By |2020-11-21T16:31:24-06:00November 21st, 2020|Categories: American Republic, Catholicism, Christianity, History, South|

Part of the South’s charm is an ability to recognize the good, true, and beautiful in traditions other than its principally Protestant identity and heritage. And Kevin Starr’s excellent history reveals that American Catholic identity is deeply Southern. Continental Achievement: Roman Catholics in the United States, by Kevin Starr (330 pages, Ignatius Press, 2020) [...]

On Being a Southern Fried Catholic

By |2020-11-07T16:52:41-06:00November 7th, 2020|Categories: Catholicism, Christianity, Dwight Longenecker, Senior Contributors, South|

My experience of Southern Catholics is that they are like fried chicken: They may be spicy and crunchy on the outside—living from hand to mouth, building new churches and schools, and raising money for pet projects, realizing they are somewhat suspect and on the edge—but they are warm and tender on the inside. The [...]

Understanding William Faulkner

By |2020-09-25T16:33:48-05:00September 24th, 2020|Categories: Books, Cleanth Brooks, Imagination, John Crowe Ransom, Literature, South|

In the forties and fifties, the most influential literary quarterlies in America featured “new criticism,” a brand of formalism that never succumbed to the absolute relativism of the deconstructionists. One of their foremost practitioners was Cleanth Brooks, who devoted himself to interpreting and popularizing the work of one of America’s greatest but most difficult [...]

“Good Things Out of Nazareth”: The Letters & Life of Flannery O’Connor

By |2020-07-30T12:22:15-05:00August 2nd, 2020|Categories: Books, Christianity, Flannery O'Connor, Literature, South|

“Good Things Out of Nazareth: The Uncollected Letters of Flannery O’Connor and Friends” is the epistolary record of Flannery O’Connor’s other life, the life lived behind the printed page in small-town Georgia. This life is not nearly as “large and startling” as her fiction, but it is unforgettable all the same. Good Things Out [...]

“I’ll Take My Stand” as Southern Epic

By |2020-07-17T17:55:43-05:00July 17th, 2020|Categories: Agrarianism, Books, South|

Ever since the first stir they created in the early 1930s the Southern Agrarians have been difficult to assess. How serious, politically and economically, were they in what they advocated? How much agreement was there among them? The four collected above papers point up and even accentuate their divergence, investigating wide-ranging and, at least [...]

Nothing But Glory Gained: Pickett’s Charge at Gettysburg

By |2020-06-30T19:10:31-05:00July 2nd, 2020|Categories: Civil War, History, Robert Cheeks, Robert E. Lee, South|

On that summer-hot afternoon at Gettysburg, after two days of fighting in the summer-lush Pennsylvania countryside, the fate of two nations still hung in the balance. General Robert E. Lee intended to tip the scales. Just before 3 o’clock on the morning of July 3, 1863, Robert E. Lee rose by starlight, ate a [...]

The Benedict Option and the Case for Spiritual Secession

By |2020-06-15T09:45:53-05:00June 13th, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Conservatism, Donald Trump, Liberalism, Politics, South|

We are called to be contemplatives in the world, not of it or above it. Since our true life is not here where political parties constantly vie for our affection, we can let go of all this nonsense and focus on neighbor love. That doesn’t mean not voting or not dealing with the massive [...]

The Richard Weaver-Abraham Lincoln Debate

By |2020-06-01T19:06:06-05:00June 1st, 2020|Categories: Abraham Lincoln, Civil War, Conservatism, Literature, Reason, Richard Weaver, South|

For some time I had puzzled over a discrepancy or inconsistency between two of Richard Weaver’s essays which treat of Lincoln to one degree or another. In his “Abraham Lincoln and the Argument from Definition” (1953), Weaver praises Lincoln as a “conservative” by virtue of his employment of the argument from definition on such [...]

If Only Progressives Could Learn to Think Small

By |2020-05-23T22:55:24-05:00May 28th, 2020|Categories: Civil Society, Community, Conservatism, Government, Wendell Berry|

Nostalgia for the smaller face-to-face societies of the past is common to both progressives and conservatives. There was a time, whether it was 100 years ago or 10,000, when relationships between people were more meaningful, families lived more in harmony with nature, and communities worked together to care for the young and the needy. [...]

Bridging the North-South Divide: Jonathan Edwards and James Thornwell

By |2020-05-01T05:32:46-05:00May 2nd, 2020|Categories: American Republic, American Revolution, Christianity, Civil War, History, Religion, South, Theology|

The narrative of a North-South divide in American History is a powerful, yet problematic one. However, closer metaphysical inspection of both regions uncovers a series of considerable similarities and ironic connections between the Puritans of New England fully embodied in Jonathan Edwards, and the Presbyterians of the Old South fully embodied in James Thornwell. [...]

Jurgen Habermas, John C. Calhoun, and Slavery

By |2020-04-03T20:48:09-05:00April 3rd, 2020|Categories: American Republic, History, John C. Calhoun, Slavery, South|

Perhaps no American thinker has suffered more from a scholarly hegemony of discourse than John C. Calhoun, whose work and personage are often dismissed by his critics for a single phrase attributed to him, diminishing the careful and complicated analysis he deserves. The careful reader does not have to be a devotee of Jürgen [...]

Old Rowan Oak: William Faulkner’s Conservatism

By |2020-03-31T17:15:52-05:00March 31st, 2020|Categories: Books, Conservatism, Literature, South|

Russell Kirk’s Ten Conservative Principles reflect the way William Faulkner wrote, acted, and organized his life. As a property owner with notions of limited government, he brought that orientation to his fiction, to his work in Hollywood, to his commentary on civil rights, and to his everyday relationships with his family and community. His [...]

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