Jurgen Habermas, John C. Calhoun, and Slavery

By |2020-04-03T20:48:09-05:00April 3rd, 2020|Categories: American Republic, History, John C. Calhoun, Slavery, South|

Perhaps no American thinker has suffered more from a scholarly hegemony of discourse than John C. Calhoun, whose work and personage are often dismissed by his critics for a single phrase attributed to him, diminishing the careful and complicated analysis he deserves. The careful reader does not have to be a devotee of Jürgen [...]

Old Rowan Oak: William Faulkner’s Conservatism

By |2020-03-31T17:15:52-05:00March 31st, 2020|Categories: Books, Conservatism, Literature, South|

Russell Kirk’s Ten Conservative Principles reflect the way William Faulkner wrote, acted, and organized his life. As a property owner with notions of limited government, he brought that orientation to his fiction, to his work in Hollywood, to his commentary on civil rights, and to his everyday relationships with his family and community. His [...]

Donald Davidson: The Poet as Citizen

By |2020-02-28T15:58:33-06:00February 28th, 2020|Categories: Agrarianism, Donald Davidson, Literature, Poetry, Politics, South, Southern Agrarians|

It may be true that Donald Davidson went too far in his concern for art’s effect on the community. Given the decadence of much popular and highbrow art in our time, perhaps other readers of Davidson’s verse find themselves in a curious predicament. Like me, they may find fault with the principles of his [...]

The Forgotten Corners of Alexander Stephens’ “Cornerstone Speech”

By |2020-02-06T15:08:37-06:00August 12th, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Civil War, Equality, Government, History, Politics, Secession, Slavery, South, War|

History is complex, messy, and unyielding to our dearest wishes for easy categorization. That Alexander Stephens understood the Confederacy through its cornerstone of slavery is plainly true and explained in his own words. But the “Cornerstone Speech” goes further, planting the other corners of the Confederate state in concerns over federalism and sovereignty. Anxious [...]

Boyd Cathey’s “The Land We Love” as an Admonition to My Co-Religionists

By |2019-08-02T23:09:38-05:00August 2nd, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Catholicism, Christianity, Civil War, Politics, South, War|

Under advanced liberalism there is an expectation that anybody who so much as dares to speak civilly to or about any figure associated with the Confederacy is to be deemed persona non grata. For Catholics as Catholics, such sweeping and absolutist expectations are simply unacceptable. Forth from its scabbard, high in the air Beneath [...]

John Randolph of Roanoke & the Formation of a Southern Conservatism

By |2019-05-23T22:19:37-05:00May 23rd, 2019|Categories: American Founding, Civil Society, Conservatism, Economics, History, John Randolph of Roanoke, South|

John Randolph of Roanoke, one of the great exponents of the Southern political tradition, knew that what was proper to any state government was the preservation of the received order. The duty of the citizen of the commonwealth was to resist any legislative or constitutional changes to the received order, and to grant a [...]

A Day of Reckoning: Glenn Arbery’s “Bearings and Distances”

By |2020-01-09T11:59:18-06:00May 16th, 2019|Categories: Books, Culture, Fiction, Glenn Arbery, Imagination, Literature, South|

Glenn Arbery’s “Bearings and Distances” shuttles back and forth between two eras, weaving, careening, towards an inexorable revelation of truth. The plot is rich and complex, and its world is both fertile and elusive in meaning, expanding through time and culture, expressing a deeply Catholic view of the cosmos. Bearings and Distances, by Glenn [...]

C.S. Lewis in the Deep South

By |2019-04-13T16:06:57-05:00April 13th, 2019|Categories: C.S. Lewis, Culture, Dwight Longenecker, Literature, Senior Contributors, South|

With a dream, hard work, and real sacrifice, the good Christian people at Bob Jones University have created something beautiful and real. By creating Narnia onstage, they are captivating the imaginations of a new generation of children and sneaking them past the ever-watchful and increasingly dangerous dragons of secular materialism. When I left Bob [...]

The Faith and the South

By |2019-09-28T09:49:46-05:00February 8th, 2019|Categories: American Founding, Catholicism, Christianity, History, Joseph Pearce, Religion, Senior Contributors, South, StAR|

When we think of “the faith and the South” we tend to think of Protestantism in general, and perhaps the Southern Baptists in particular, especially in terms of the so-called Bible Belt. There is, however, much more to the South than the Protestant evangelical or fundamentalist culture that has made its presence felt, socially [...]

Lord Acton and the American Civil War

By |2019-10-03T14:39:20-05:00February 7th, 2019|Categories: American Republic, Civil War, Classical Liberalism, History, John C. Calhoun, South|

Lord Acton believed that the wrong side won the American Civil War. Such a judgment could hardly be said to be a minor detail of someone’s historical worldview, yet this judgment has somehow been obscured… “Power tends to corrupt; absolute power corrupts absolutely.” Among Catholic students of political thought, few figures are more liable [...]

Wendell Berry’s “What Are People For?”

By |2018-08-30T21:13:19-05:00August 30th, 2018|Categories: Books, Conservation, Conservatism, Modernity, Wendell Berry|

As one reads What Are People For?, an important underlying and unifying theme—the struggle to avoid abstraction—emerges, a theme which reveals perhaps Wendell Berry’s greatest concern about modern life... What Are People For? by Wendell Berry (224 pages, North Point Press, 1990) “We should love life,” Dostoyevski once said, “more than the idea of life.” It is [...]

Saving Architectural Treasures of the Old South

By |2019-03-05T14:31:27-06:00July 27th, 2018|Categories: Architecture, Civilization, History, South|

The South’s combination of architectural preservation with genealogy and with the documentation of human toil has often resulted in a much richer testament of the past and a more balanced view of the region’s history… In the film version of Margaret Mitchell’s Gone With the Wind, after Atlanta has been burned and Scarlett O’Hara is [...]