In Defense of Elitism

By |2020-03-06T10:57:46-06:00March 4th, 2020|Categories: Culture, Humanities, Roger Scruton, Timeless Essays|

People don’t like hierarchies and privileges, and there is a natural disposition to say that they’re not deserved. When anybody claims some kind of hierarchical position, the question is raised, “Who is he? Who does he think he is? And by what right does he claim this superiority over me?” Today’s offering in our [...]

The Threat of Free Speech in the University

By |2020-03-04T16:33:59-06:00February 26th, 2020|Categories: Culture, Education, Featured, Free Speech, Modernity, Roger Scruton, Timeless Essays|

Now I, too, would like the university to be a safe space, but a safe space for rational argument about the pressing issues of our time. If a university stands for anything, surely it stands for that idea of truth, as a guiding light in our darkness and the source of real knowledge. Today’s [...]

George Washington and the Patience of Power

By |2020-03-01T02:47:33-06:00February 21st, 2020|Categories: American Founding, American Republic, George Washington, History, Timeless Essays, Virtue, War|

What enabled George Washington to be so different from other victorious commanders? He had little innate patience but held immense power. How—and where—did he learn patience? Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join David Hein, as he considers the virtues that endowed George Washington with perseverance and [...]

Sacred Truths in a Profane World

By |2020-03-04T16:41:57-06:00February 2nd, 2020|Categories: Christianity, Culture, Homosexual Unions, Islam, Marriage, Religion, Roger Scruton, Timeless Essays, Truth|

By and large the educated elites in the Western world today are without religious belief and often animated by what I call a “culture of repudiation,” keen to banish old ideas of the sacred from public life and to remake the institutions and structures of civil society so as to reflect their own liberated lifestyle. [...]

How Bad Philosophy Destroyed Good Music

By |2020-03-04T16:45:02-06:00January 19th, 2020|Categories: Culture, Music, Roger Scruton, Timeless Essays|

True artists are not the antagonists of tradition but its latest advocates. They belong to the future because they are guardians of the past. Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join the late Sir Roger Scruton, as he considers how bad thinking has created bad music, and what can [...]

The Last Speech: “A Thing Called Civilization”

By |2020-01-12T15:54:16-06:00January 12th, 2020|Categories: Roger Scruton, Timeless Essays, Western Civilization|

On September 19, 2019, at the fourteenth annual Gala for Western Civilization, the Intercollegiate Studies Institute presented Sir Roger Scruton with the Defender of Western Civilization award. Sir Roger gave these remarks on accepting the award. He had recently been diagnosed with cancer, the disease that would bring about his death on January 12, 2020. [...]

Athena as Founder & Statesman

By |2019-12-27T17:59:57-06:00December 27th, 2019|Categories: Justice, Literature, Myth, Politics, Religion, Statesman, Timeless Essays|

In the “Oresteia,” Aeschylus examines whether a city exists for proper worship of gods or whether it exists for proper cultivation of “that which is most divine in us.” Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join John Alvis, as he considers Aeschylus’ views of the polity as embodied [...]

Finding Faith in the Manger: Berlioz’s “Infancy of Christ”

By |2019-12-25T02:41:26-06:00December 24th, 2019|Categories: Christmas, Hector Berlioz, Hector Berlioz Sesquicentennial Series, Music, Timeless Essays|

Could anything as tender and touching as "L’Enfance du Christ" have been written by a man who did not believe? One hopes that professed atheist Hector Berlioz was able to find the Christmas that he portrayed so beautifully. Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join Robert Reilly, as he [...]

Mystically at the Crib

By |2019-12-24T01:20:09-06:00December 23rd, 2019|Categories: Christianity, Christmas, Culture, Timeless Essays, Wyoming Catholic College|

The baby in the cave is a paradox that reveals you and demands your potential for dignity, sacrificial love, demands in love that you become what you were made to be—and does this with the sweet, absolutely helpless cry of a newborn child. His very helplessness, like the poor of the world, the helpless, [...]

The Postmodern Heroism of John Milton

By |2019-12-08T22:05:31-06:00December 8th, 2019|Categories: Culture, England, Great Books, John Milton, Literature, Politics, Timeless Essays|

Instead of putting John Milton in the context of his own time, scholar David Hawkes proposes to put him in the context of ours, believing that the great poet and political writer’s life and work offer solutions to our own predicament. Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to [...]

A Thanksgiving Tale of Redemption: “Planes, Trains and Automobiles”

By |2019-11-28T19:29:02-06:00November 27th, 2019|Categories: Audio/Video, Film, Stephen M. Klugewicz, Thanksgiving, Timeless Essays|

A lighthearted romp at first blush, “Planes, Trains and Automobiles” yet tells the story of how the example of simple goodness can be transformational… Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join Stephen Klugewicz, as he discusses the humanity of the 1980s John Hughes comedy, Planes, Trains and Automobiles.—W. [...]

All That Is Beautiful & Terrible: The Feast of Saint Cecilia

By |2019-11-22T21:25:07-06:00November 22nd, 2019|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Christendom, Conservatism, Sainthood, Timeless Essays, Western Civilization|

No matter how corrupt and bleak and depressing the world may appear, we can always turn to the many Cecilias of the world and see the goodness that is possible through grace and love. Properly remembered, these true symbols and true myths can re-orient our souls, our cultures, and perhaps even the world itself toward [...]

Tolkien & Anglo-Saxon England: Protectors of Christendom

By |2020-02-01T12:32:53-06:00November 10th, 2019|Categories: Bradley J. Birzer, Christendom, Christian Humanism, England, History, J.R.R. Tolkien, Myth, Senior Contributors, StAR, Timeless Essays|

J.R.R. Tolkien believed that the Anglo-Saxon world might offer us strength to redeem Christendom. The hero of “The Lord of the Rings,” after all, is an Anglo-Saxon farmer turned citizen-warrior. Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join Bradley J. Birzer, as he discusses J.R.R. Tolkien’s christological interpretation [...]