Odysseus: Patron Hero of the Liberal Arts

By |2019-02-25T14:28:17-06:00February 4th, 2019|Categories: Audio/Video, Classics, E.B., Education, Eva Brann, Great Books, Homer, In Honor of Eva Brann at 90 Series, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning, Odyssey, St. John's College|

Odysseus has the art we need. I think he came by it through a rare combination of acutely honed cleverness and deep-souled imagination; we can acquire it by education. This art, the art of discovering significance, is the art of interpretation... I am to write about my hero Odysseus and to connect him to Liberal [...]

Liberal Learning, the Human Person, and Plato’s “Meno”

By |2019-02-25T14:28:30-06:00January 28th, 2019|Categories: Audio/Video, Classics, E.B., Eva Brann, Great Books, In Honor of Eva Brann at 90 Series, Liberal Learning, Meno, Plato, St. John's College|

“First attend to the adjustment of your own soul, particularly the regulative liberal learning of your intellect, then project your internal economy on the world as social and political justice. The other way around is headless.”  – Eva Brann, The Music of the Republic: Essays on Socrates’ Conversations and Plato’s Writings Eva Brann is a [...]

The Classics and Christianity

By |2019-01-11T15:44:57-06:00January 11th, 2019|Categories: C.S. Lewis, Christianity, Civilization, Classical Education, Classics, Culture, Great Books, Homer, Liberal Learning, Literature, Myth, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors, St. Augustine, Virgil, Western Civilization, Western Tradition, Worldview|

Christians invented the classical curriculum; it is as much part of the broader Western inheritance as it is specifically part of the Christian inheritance… Why study old books? How do dusty old books written by dead men and women thousands of years ago grow my faith? Such can be common thoughts when the Christian [...]

What, Then, Is Time?

By |2019-02-25T14:29:59-06:00January 7th, 2019|Categories: Aristotle, Classics, E.B., Eva Brann, Great Books, In Honor of Eva Brann at 90 Series, Liberal Learning, St. Augustine, St. John's College, Time|

When our dean asked me to lecture this September it was because I’ve just completed a book on time, and I’m happy to have the opportunity to talk about it. There seemed to be three possible kinds of profit that I figured might come to you and to me if I gave what one might [...]

Why Read Old (Pagan) Books?

By |2018-12-30T11:08:24-06:00December 30th, 2018|Categories: Christianity, Classics, Great Books, Humanities, Liberal Learning, Timeless Essays, Wyoming Catholic College|

Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join Jason Baxter, as he considers why Christians should read the works of the pagans. —W. Winston Elliott III, Publisher At the end of each semester, I inevitably have one or two well-meaning students who are still unsure why they were asked [...]

An Education to Restore Wonder

By |2019-08-06T17:19:31-05:00December 29th, 2018|Categories: Classical Education, Classical Learning, Classics, Education, Great Books, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning, Wyoming Catholic College|

We’ve reached a time when fewer and fewer on the outside know what the liberal arts are, or the value of them to the individual person, an organization, and the marketplace of ideas. In an age when people are so focused on science and technology via “STEM” subjects, we’ve lost our sense of wonder… [...]

Talking, Reading, Writing, Listening

By |2019-02-25T14:30:41-06:00December 10th, 2018|Categories: Classics, E.B., Eva Brann, Great Books, In Honor of Eva Brann at 90 Series, Liberal Learning, Plato, St. John's College|

I imagine that on Parents’ Weekend there might be some parents attending this once weekly occasion when the college assembles to hear a lecture. By its very name, a lecture is read—but read out loud, delivered in the writer’s voice. Thus, the sequence goes: I thought, I wrote, I read, I speak. Although this is the principal way of [...]

An Annunciation on the Battlefield

By |2020-03-25T08:19:00-05:00December 1st, 2018|Categories: Beauty, Books, Christianity, Classics, Fiction, Literature, Paul Krause, Senior Contributors, War|

It is the encounter with beauty, all-consuming beauty, the infinite, which directs the human soul back to God. The sky calls us up; the earth drags us down. On December 2, 1805, the French Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte achieved his most spectacular victory at the Battle of Austerlitz against an allied army of Russians and Austrians. [...]

Jane Austen Forever!

By |2018-11-28T21:34:42-06:00November 28th, 2018|Categories: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Books, Classics, Culture, Education, Fiction, Jane Austen, Literature, Television|

Pick up a Jane Austen novel, and you will discover that behind the long gowns and country dances, people in her era struggled with the same weaknesses we struggle with today. Well-written stories like Austen’s bring to life the human drama that is played out in every age, in every heart… I’ve been reading [...]

Welcome to Colonus: The Theban Plays of Sophocles

By |2019-05-14T17:29:20-05:00August 13th, 2018|Categories: Antigone, Books, Classics, E.B., Eva Brann, Great Books, Liberal Learning, St. John's College, Tradition|

I’m uncertain of the joy of reading the Theban plays of Sophocles—the story is just too monstrous—but in accord with the awe. This translation conveys it… Sophocles: The Theban Plays, translated by David R. Slavitt (256 pages, Yale University Press, 2009) This is the most stripped-down version of the three Theban plays of Sophocles [...]

Music of the Republic

By |2018-07-13T22:00:54-05:00July 8th, 2018|Categories: Christopher B. Nelson, Classics, Great Books, Liberal Learning, Music, Plato, St. John's College, Timeless Essays, Virtue|

Music pervades our lives and always has. It has taken you outside of yourselves and taken you deep within. It has been associated with things divine… Today’s offering in our Timeless Essay series affords our readers the opportunity to join Christopher Nelson as he explores the music of the Republic of the United States [...]

Finding Your “Why”

By |2018-07-07T15:50:14-05:00July 7th, 2018|Categories: Christianity, Classics, Education, Great Books, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning|

What enabled men like Athanasius, Augustine, and Aquinas to discover their “why” in ages past can still transform young men and women today… Over the years, I have discovered that nearly every time I come across an especially pithy, insightful, beautifully-expressed quotation, it seems to be attributable either to Winston Churchill or Mark Twain. [...]