Can We Live Without Enchantment?

By |2021-05-11T15:23:43-05:00May 10th, 2021|Categories: Modernity, Mystery, Philosophy, Science, St. John's College, Truth, Wilfred McClay|

Is the presumptuous mapping of all material reality a boon to humankind, or will it prove a curse? Might an acknowledgment of mystery as a steady and enduring feature of our condition be key to our mental and moral health, and our sense of our own freedom? This essay was co-authored with Donald A. Yerxa.* [...]

Advancing in Darkness: Some Reflections on our Ahistorical Present

By |2021-05-11T09:24:48-05:00May 9th, 2021|Categories: Civilization, Education, History, Liberal Learning, Modernity|

The study of history in public schools should be conducted with an eye to “fostering good citizenship.” But it should do more than that. It should foster good human beings—human beings with broad minds and contemplative souls who appreciate the power of ideas. “If history be, in truth, the self consciousness of humanity, the ‘self [...]

Cursive and the Brave New World

By |2021-05-08T14:58:34-05:00May 8th, 2021|Categories: Glenn Arbery, Language, Science, Senior Contributors, Space, Writing, Wyoming Catholic College|

Once mastered, cursive enables us to write rapidly without lifting the pen from the paper—a skill that has major advantages over printing. Cursive now stumps many college students today. Whether it can ever make a comeback seems to be an issue. At about 10 o’clock the other night, my wife called me out of my [...]

The American College of the Building Arts

By |2021-06-11T09:02:07-05:00May 7th, 2021|Categories: Architecture, Beauty, Culture, Education, Labor/Work, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning, W. Winston Elliott III|

A. Wade Razzi, Chief Academic Officer at American College of the Building Arts, is interviewed by W. Winston Elliott III, Editor-in-Chief of The Imaginative Conservative. W. Winston Elliott III: Describe ACBA and its mission. The American College of the Building Arts was founded in the wake of Hurricane Hugo, which did massive damage to the [...]

Evelyn Waugh on Style & Substance in Writing

By |2021-05-06T16:07:32-05:00May 6th, 2021|Categories: David Deavel, Evelyn Waugh, Literature, Senior Contributors, Writing|

Evelyn Waugh understands that if a writer is to develop, he “must concern himself more and more with Style.” By approaching words with the attention and craft of a tailor, the literary artist not only communicates but also gives pleasure to others. “What do you think you’re doing?” It’s a question I occasionally get from [...]

The Case for the Liberal Arts: Stronger Than Ever?

By |2021-05-05T16:49:37-05:00May 5th, 2021|Categories: Classics, Education, Featured, Liberal Arts, Liberal Learning, Plato, St. John's College, Timeless Essays, Wilfred McClay|

The chief public benefit of liberal education is the formation of a particular kind of person, a particular kind of citizen, who robustly embodies the virtues of both inquiry and membership, and therefore is equipped for the truth-seeking deliberation and responsible action that a republican form of government requires. If we are to make any [...]

Books Your Kids Should Read to Combat Wokeism

By |2021-04-27T16:29:15-05:00April 27th, 2021|Categories: Education, Great Books, Wokeism|

The type of virtues taught in “woke” history courses have little to do with traditional, Christian virtues. So how do parents circumvent this progressive teaching of history? Here is a list of books that your kids should read. “Our children need to learn more history and civics!” is a regular rallying cry for those who [...]

Reimagining Education to Give Parents More Power

By |2021-04-26T16:34:56-05:00April 26th, 2021|Categories: Education|

Given that parents everywhere during the pandemic have been forced to think—and re-think—the role and place of public education, this might well be the very moment to “re-imagine” the whole matter of the organization and delivery of such education, so as to elevate the status of parents among schooling decision-makers. As our public schools gradually [...]

Neil Postman’s Vision of Humane Education

By |2021-04-24T08:09:06-05:00April 23rd, 2021|Categories: Education, Information Age, Liberal Learning, Neil Postman, Technology|

Whether it be in the context of public schools, private schools, home-centered education, co-ops, or learning pods, revisiting Neil Postman’s vision will help foster humane education in our Zoom World. It was nearly sixty years ago when famed media theorist Marshall McLuhan penned The Gutenburg Galaxy as “a series of historical observations” regarding the cultural [...]

Saving the Classics From Cancel Culture

By |2021-04-14T11:06:42-05:00April 23rd, 2021|Categories: Civilization, Classics, Culture, Great Books, Joseph Pearce, Literature, Senior Contributors|

Joseph Pearce, series editor of the Ignatius Critical Editions, is interviewed by Paul Senz. Paul Senz: What prompted you and Ignatius Press to produce the series of Ignatius Critical Editions? Joseph Pearce: As someone who has taught undergraduate students for many years, I am well aware of the hijacking of the study of literature by [...]

A Worthy Chase: Pursuing an Ideal Education

By |2021-04-22T09:39:55-05:00April 18th, 2021|Categories: Books, Classical Learning, Education, Eva Brann, Liberal Learning, St. John's College|

Eva Brann’s latest book, “Pursuits of Happiness,” is a collection of essays which range from Aeschylus to Austen, with topics spanning the nature of time itself to Sacred Scripture. Interspersed here are two parts constituting the whole of an ideal education. Pursuits of Happiness: On Being Interested by Eva Brann (640 pages, Paul Dry Books, [...]

Zoom, the Pandemic, & the Death of Sacred Spaces

By |2021-04-15T12:32:24-05:00April 18th, 2021|Categories: Community, Coronavirus, Culture, Education, Science, Technology|

When the pandemic separated us from our sacred spaces like the church or other communal places, Zoom promised connection. However, Zoom—as a medium of education and relationship—prevents us from truly connecting because of technology’s nature to divide, distract, and isolate. But when it came to the subject of letters, Theuth said, ‘But this study, King [...]

Fields of Culture

By |2021-04-27T20:25:41-05:00April 17th, 2021|Categories: Community, Culture, Glenn Arbery, Liberal Learning, Wyoming Catholic College|

The culture of a real community like that of college isn’t simply a matter of texts and discussions of ideas, but of live emotion and thought, real presence to each other, a continuous awareness and exchange that locates each person in the larger community. Yesterday afternoon, during one of our regular meetings with the freshman [...]

“The Karate Kid” & the Merits of Authority-Based Discipleship

By |2021-04-22T10:02:20-05:00April 16th, 2021|Categories: Culture, Education, Film, Liberal Learning|

In the 1984 film “The Karate Kid,” Mr. Miyagi’s teaching method may seem scandalous to Western eyes: Either Daniel does things his way, or not at all. The wise mentor refuses to reveal to Daniel the reason for his menial exercises. But it is precisely the virtue of submission and obedience that is essential for [...]

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